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“Our results showed that limiting access to certain foods – ‘restrictive feeding,’ as we call it – was related to a higher weight status in children,” said Dr. Myles Faith, the study’s senior investigator and associate professor of nutrition at the Gillings School.

“Our results showed that limiting access to certain foods was related to a higher weight status in children,” said Dr. Myles Faith, associate professor of nutrition. Photo by David Goehring.

Withholding certain foods from children may lead to weight gain, study finds

 

Many parents believe the best way to prevent their children from becoming obese is to limit their intake of calories or withhold particular types of foods altogether. A new study from the Gillings School’s Dr. Myles Faith challenges this belief. The study supports growing evidence that, in the long term, these tactics actually may produce the opposite effect.



Recent SPH News


Dr. Geni Eng

Dr. Geni Eng

Eng inducted into Academy of Community Engagement Scholarship

Eugenia Eng, DrPH, professor of health behavior at UNC’s Gillings School of Global Public Health, was inducted as an inaugural member of the Academy of Community Engagement Scholarship on Oct. 7, in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.


Dr. Rebecca Fry

Dr. Rebecca Fry

High levels of metals in well water may be linked to birth defects in children

In a research article published by BioMed Central Public Health, researchers at the Gillings School and colleagues from the N.C. Birth Defects Monitoring Program (NCBDMP) found associations between statewide levels of metals in wells and detrimental health outcomes.


Dr. Jim Herrington

Dr. Jim Herrington

Herrington named executive director of School’s Gillings Global Gateway

Jim Herrington, PhD, MPH, has been named executive director of the Gillings Global Gateway (GGG) and Professor of the Practice of health behavior at UNC’s Gillings School of Global Public Health.


Lindsey Smith

Lindsey Smith

Study: Daily tasks can get sedentary workers closer to national physical activity guidelines

“Reducing screen time is important, but it’s also vital that people recognize too much time sitting doing anything can be detrimental, especially for people who sit all day at work,” said Lindsey Smith, MPH, doctoral candidate in nutrition at the Gillings School and first author on the study. “This includes sitting while socializing, reading, running errands and other non-work activities.”


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Spring 2014 Update

The UNC Gillings Spring 2014 Update is now available.

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