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Dr. Brian Pence

Dr. Brian Wells Pence

Depression can be treated well in HIV care, study finds

With appropriate support, people with HIV/AIDS can manage their depression effectively, according to a new study co-led by Brian Wells Pence, PhD, associate professor of epidemiology at the Gillings School. However, effective depression treatment — even when combined with brief counseling about the importance of HIV medication adherence — did not lead to improvements in adherence or health outcomes in study participants.


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Recent SPH News


Dr. Ashley Kranz

Dr. Ashley Kranz

Dr. Gary Rozier

Dr. Gary Rozier

Study finds low-income children benefit from preventive oral health services

Oral health services, delivered by primary care clinicians and designed to prevent dental caries (cavities) in young children, can improve the oral health of kindergartners enrolled in Medicaid, according to a new study by three researchers affiliated with the Gillings School. However, more effort is required to coordinate services between medical and dental practitioners so the children’s improved oral health care can be continued over time.


Dr. Rick Luettich (photo by Dan Sears)

Dr. Rick Luettich

ESE’s Luettich to serve as principal investigator at new Coastal Resilience Center of Excellence

Department of Homeland Security recently announced a $20 million award to UNC over five years to conduct research and provide public education on ways to reduce harm from coastal natural disasters. Rick Luettich, ScD, principle investigator at the new center, is also the director of UNC’s Institute of Marine Sciences and a jointly appointed professor in the Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering at the Gillings School.


Dr. Til Stürmer

Dr. Til Stürmer

SSRIs may increase fracture risk in middle-aged women without psychiatric disorders, study finds

The United States Food and Drug Administration recently approved the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) to treat symptoms of menopause such as hot flashes and night sweats. SSRIs are highly effective at reducing these symptoms, but little is known about the risks associated with SSRI use in patients without mental disorders. A team of researchers including Til Stürmer, MD, PhD, professor and director of the Center for Pharmacoepidemiology, and Virginia Pate, MS, applications analyst, both with the Department of Epidemiology at the Gillings School, examined the impact of SSRI use on fracture risk in women from 40 to 64 years old with no record of mental illness.


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