Category

Epidemiology News

Taking too many medications may increase frailty in older adults

November 7, 2019
New research from UNC Gillings suggests that the simultaneous use of five or more medications may contribute to frailty, which can leave older adults more vulnerable to worsening health outcomes, including hospitalizations, falls, disability and death.

Adimora elected to National Academy of Medicine

November 7, 2019
Dr. Adaora Adimora of the UNC Gillings School has been elected to the National Academy of Medicine — one of the highest honors in the fields of health and medicine — for her research on heterosexual HIV transmission and prevention among African Americans.

With $19.4M, UNC researchers will combat chronic illnesses linked with HIV

October 31, 2019
The Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study / Women’s Interagency HIV Study Combined Cohort Study is a collaborative research effort to understand and reduce the impact of chronic health conditions that affect people living with HIV. Dr. Adaora Adimora leads the UNC-Chapel Hill site, one of 13 across the country.

Solitary confinement linked with increased risk of death after release from prison

October 17, 2019
Incarcerated individuals who were placed in restrictive housing in North Carolina from 2000 to 2015 were 24% more likely to die in the first year after their release, compared to those who were not held in restrictive housing. In addition, people held in restrictive housing were 78% more likely to die from suicide, 54% more likely to die from homicide and 127% more likely to die from an opioid overdose in the first two weeks after their release.

Can a screening for social determinants of health effectively inform children's health care?

October 7, 2019
A study by students and faculty at the UNC Gillings School explored whether screening tools that examine social determinants of health in children can accurately identify early indicators of risk. Based on the researchers' comprehensive review of existing literature, it remains unclear whether such screenings — which aim to consider risk factors outside traditional medical information — inform better care for children.