About Global Health
At Gillings, our global health work impacts policy and programs locally and globally. We have an extensive network of faculty, students and alumni who conduct global health research and practice. Our community is collaborative and supportive of those who want to partner to address complex public health challenges or come to Gillings to build their careers in global health.
Local is global and global is local

Our Approach

There are four key elements that define our global-local approach:

The adaptation of interventions for different settings: This refers to using evidence-based approaches that have been developed in one setting and adapting it for application in another setting. An example of this is faculty who have developed interventions for HIV prevention interventions to reduce HIV risk for adolescents in South Africa adapting and applying their interventions for adolescent populations risk in a U.S. setting.


The application of similar approaches to engaging communities to address health inequities: Effective approaches to working with communities whether in the U.S. or outside of the U.S. use similar community-engagement approaches, including building trust, listening, and working collaboratively. These approaches are similar whether we are working in rural North Carolina or rural Vietnam.

Addressing health challenges faced by global populations living in the U.S.: Another element of this approach is the focus on our public health practice and research with immigrant populations in the U.S. The challenges immigrant communities in the U.S. face require methods and approaches that not only reflect good community engagement practices, but also a cultural tailoring of approaches to reach and achieve impact in these communities.

Addressing health challenges that have no borders: This is the idea that diseases have no borders. An infectious disease that emerges in one setting will eventually affect other regions because of the movement of people across borders.  COVID-19 is the most obvious example of this.  This reflects the idea that we need to think globally when we think about rolling out prevention tools like vaccines.  If we don’t address inequities in vaccine access across the world, there is no way that global pandemics will be controlled.

Read more about several global faculty members who are engaged in this space.

Spotlight
Get to Know Our Global Health Folx

Araba Oduro

We interviewed Araba Oduro to hear about her work as a medical doctor in Ghana, being a coach for the Making Every Baby Count project, her research here at Gillings, and more!

Global Health Seminar Series
Global Health at Gillings
80+
Global Health Faculty Members
45+
Global Health Courses
30+
Countries Where We Conduct Research
$37.9M
Secured by faculty for funding for research with global components
280+
International Students
Global Health Academic Offerings
MPH in Global Health
Executive DrPH in Leadership
PhD
Online Certificate in Global Health
This Week in Global Health Newsletter
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Support Our Students

At Gillings, we are training the next generation of global public health professionals. An important aspect of their training is applying what they have learned in the classroom in a real world context with global health organizations around the world. Travel funds can help students travel for research, pre-dissertation or dissertation work, practicum, internship and presenting at conferences. Support global travel funds for students.

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CONTACT INFORMATION
Global Health Team
globalsolutions@unc.edu

135 Dauer Drive
104 Rosenau Hall, CB #7415
Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7415
(919) 843-3945