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School News

Prevalence of pregnancy UTIs underscores need for better screening, treatment in low- and middle-income countries

April 7, 2020
Prenatal screening for urinary tract infections (UTIs) is standard practice in high-income countries because of the risk that untreated UTIs pose during pregnancy. But women in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) are still in need of screening and treatment that is accessible and accurate due to social and environmental risk factors that may contribute to the high prevalence of UTIs in pregnancy.

The Gillings Community Responds to COVID-19: Equipment, Emergency Response and Water Surveillance

April 3, 2020
Doctoral student Alex Gertner is teaming up with fellow students and experts across the UNC System to make PPE for health care workers in need. Alumna Pooja Jani is at the epicenter of a pandemic, helping to coordinate New York City's emergency public health response. Meanwhile, alumni Scott Meschke, Christine Stauber and Joe Brown are collaborating on ways to monitor wastewater to track the spread of COVID-19.

Alumna Adia Ross named CMO of Duke Regional Hospital

March 31, 2020
Dr. Adia Kamali Ross, who holds a Master of Healthcare Administration degree from the Gillings School, was named Duke Regional Hospital’s chief medical officer earlier this year. (Photo by Amy Sterns Photography)

Who gets admitted to medical education in low- and middle-income countries — and why does it matter?

March 31, 2020
Recent studies have found that doctors and nurses in low- and middle-income countries are often absent from work, sometimes seek unauthorized payments for services, and may treat patients in disrespectful or abusive ways. UNC researchers suggest a solution: reforming medical education practices to focus on admitting students who are motivated by a strong desire to serve the needs of their community, rather than by receiving external rewards.

Can social media help track the spread of disease?

March 30, 2020
Disease surveillance means monitoring the spread of disease through populations in order to establish patterns and minimize harm caused by outbreaks. In a recent article, UNC researchers explored how to effectively and ethically include social media and broader Internet tracking as part of public health surveillance.