Going Viral: Impact and Implications of the 1918 Influenza Pandemic

1918 Flu Symposium logo

Wednesday, April 4 – Friday, April 6, 2018 at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The symposium will include the Gillings School’s annual Fred T. Foard Lecture (see below) on April 5.

The symposium will include the Gillings School’s annual Fred T. Foard Lecture (see below) on April 5.

Share Your Stories
Did your grandparents ever tell you about their lives during the flu pandemic? Is there a story that has been passed down in your family about what life was like in 1918? If so, we’d like to hear from you. The Going Viral discussion website is a place to share stories, recollections, dialogue and artifacts related to the 1918 flu epidemic.
An interdisciplinary symposium to mark the 100th anniversary of one of the deadliest pandemics in human history will be hosted April 4-6, 2018, by UNC’s Gillings School of Global Public Health, UNC’s Institute for Global Health and Infectious Diseases, the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences and RTI International.

Online registration will open in January 2018. For more information or to receive email updates, contact 1918flu@unc.edu.

Symposium events will offer perspectives from the vantage points of medicine, health, social sciences and the humanities. Speakers include leading experts in epidemiology, virology, medicine, communications, literature, history, ethics, policy and other fields.


Photo of Gina Kolata

Gina Kolata

Keynote Speaker: Gina Kolata

On Thursday, April 5, at 6 p.m., as keynote speaker for the symposium, Gina Kolata will deliver the 50th annual Fred T. Foard Jr. Memorial lecture.

Kolata, best-selling author and journalist for the The New York Times, is a two-time Pulitzer Prize finalist who specializes in demystifying the science of personal health. She is the author of six books, including the best seller Flu: The Story of the Great Influenza Pandemic of 1918 and the Search for the Virus that Caused It. Her acclaimed writing has influenced public policy and upended conventional wisdom.


Cover of Flu: The Story of the Great Influenza Pandemic of 1918 and the Search for the Virus that Caused It

Kolata’s book explores how we might prevent a recurrence of flu as devastating as the 1918 pandemic.

Flu: The Story of the Great Influenza Pandemic of 1918 and the Search for the Virus that Caused It

In 1918 the Great Flu Pandemic killed an estimated 50 million people virtually overnight. If such a plague returned today, taking a comparable percentage of the world’s population, 150 million people would die.

In this best-selling non-fiction account, acclaimed science journalist Gina Kolata unravels the mystery of this lethal virus with the high drama of a great adventure story.

From Alaska to Norway, from the streets of Hong Kong to the corridors of the White House, Kolata tracks the race to recover the live pathogen and probes the fear that has impelled government policy.

Flu compellingly addresses the prospects for a great epidemic’s recurrence and considers what we can do to prevent it.


Wednesday, April 4
The Louis Round Wilson Library, UNC-Chapel Hill

O Lost! The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Thomas Wolfe and the Great Influenza Pandemic of 1918

Host and moderator: Robert A. Blouin, PharmD, Executive Vice Chancellor and Provost, Bryson Distinguished Professor, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

6–8 p.m.

Reception and Program
The reception will include music from 1918, dramatic readings, photo exhibits and an exhibit provided by UNC Libraries.


“Impact of 1918 Flu on the UNC-Chapel Hill Community”
 
Howard E. Covington Jr., historian and biographer


“Impact of 1918 Flu in the Life and Literature of UNC Alumnus Thomas Wolfe, author of Look Homeward, Angel
 
Paula Gallant Eckard, PhD, director of American Studies, associate professor of English, UNC-Charlotte; editor, Thomas Wolfe Review; past-president, Thomas Wolfe Society


Moderated discussion/questions

Thursday, April 5 – Morning Events
The William and Ida Friday Center for Continuing Education

Welcomes

8:30-8:45 a.m.

Carol L. Folt, PhD, Chancellor, UNC-Chapel Hill


Congressman David Price, U.S. Representative for North Carolina’s 4th congressional district

The 1918 Influenza Pandemic: History, Narrative and Context

Session host and moderator: Allison Aiello, PhD, professor of epidemiology, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

8:45-9:15 a.m.

“The 1918 Flu Pandemic: A Worldwide Historical Perspective”
Origin, scope, nature and impact of one of the largest, deadliest pandemics in human history


Howard Markel, MD, PhD, George E. Wantz, MD Distinguished Professor of the History of Medicine; director, Center for the History of Medicine; professor of pediatrics and communicable diseases; professor of history, professor of health management and policy, professor of psychiatry, University of Michigan; author of When Germs Travel”; editor-in-chief of “Encyclopedia of 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic

9:15-9:35 a.m.

“Narrative Frames and Contagion: How they shape our collective response to pandemics”


Priscilla Wald, PhD, R. Florence Brinkley Professor of English, professor of Women’s Studies, Duke University; author of Contagious: Cultures, Carriers, and the Outbreak Narrative

9:35-9:55 a.m.

“The Historical Context of the 1918 Flu Pandemic in North Carolina and the South”


James L. Leloudis, PhD, professor of history; associate dean for Honors Carolina; director, James M. Johnston Center for Undergraduate Excellence

9:55-10:10 a.m.

Moderated questions/discussion

10:10-10:30 a.m.

Break

Epidemiology and Virology of the 1918 Flu Pandemic

Session host and moderator: Ralph Baric, PhD, professor of epidemiology, Gillings School of Global Public Health; professor of microbiology and immunology, School of Medicine; University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

10:30-10:50 a.m.

“Unraveling Influenza Virus Pathogenic Mechanisms; from the Early Flu Hunters to Today”


Adolfo Garcia-Sastre, PhD, professor, Department of Microbiology, Fishberg Professor, Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases; Director, Global Health and Emerging Pathogens Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

10:50-11:10 a.m.

“Developing Better Vaccines: Right Around the Corner?”


Barney S. Graham, MD, PhD, Senior Investigator, Viral Pathogenesis Laboratory, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Vaccine Research Center, National Institutes of Health

11:10-11:30 a.m.

“Better Antivirals: Will They be Ready?”
Status of development of highly effective antivirals that could be given to patients in hospitals and other clinical settings and/or other medical interventions to reduce mortality in those who become sick during a pandemic


Frederick G. Hayden, MD, professor of medicine and pathology, University of Virginia School of Medicine

11:30-11:45 a.m.

Moderated questions/discussion

11:50 a.m.-12:40 p.m.

Lunch

What Have We Learned from Prior Epidemics and Pandemics?

Session host and moderator: TBD

12:45-1:05 p.m.

“What have we Learned From Recent Viral Outbreaks and Influenza Epidemics that Could Help Prevent Another Pandemic?”


Yoshihiro (Yoshi) Kawaoka, DVM, PhD, professor of Virology, Department of Pathobiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison; professor and Head of Virology, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, The Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo

1:05-1:25 p.m.

“One-Health: The Interconnection of Human and Animal Health in Causing and Preventing the Next Pandemic”


Barrett Slenning, DVM, MPVM, associate professor, epidemiology and ruminant health, North Carolina State University

1:25-1:40 p.m.

“Communication About Pandemics in the Digital Age”The potential of new digital tools to overcome fear and inertia — and reach millions quickly with public health. At the same time, social media can amplify risk and give voice to vaccine deniers, heightening fear and vaccine hesitancy; potential for “fake news” and misinformation


Keri Lubell, behavioral scientist and team lead for Research and Evaluation in the Emergency Risk Communication Branch (ERCB), Division of Emergency Operations (DEO), Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response (OPHPR) at the U. S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

1:40-2 p.m.

“Past, Present and Future Ethical Implications of Pandemics”
What can we learn from the past; when supplies are limited, who gets vaccines and medical interventions? Who decides? How? Quarantine power and other questions.


James (Jim) Thomas, PhD, associate professor, Epidemiology, UNC Gillings School; Director, Measure Evaluation Project, Carolina Population Center

2-2:15 p.m.

Moderated questions/discussion

2:15-2:35 p.m.

Break

Predicting and Preventing the Next Pandemic

Session host and moderator: TBD

2:35-3:05 p.m.

“Predicting Influenza Outbreaks and Modeling Transmission of Influenza in Populations”
Global influenza surveillance and rapid response; H2N2, H5N1, H7N9, H10, H8 zoonoses; long-term consequences of pandemics in terms of antigenic variations that persist; public health implications of new strains.


TBD

3:05-3:25 p.m.

“Impact of Climate”: Seasonality, temperature and humidity in relation to influenza


TBD

3:25-3:45 p.m.

“The Intersection of Pandemics and Biopreparednes”


Greg Evans, PhD, MPH, dean and professor of Environmental Health Sciences, Jiann-Ping Hsu College of Public Health, Georgia Southern University

3:45-4:05 p.m.

TBD

4:05-4:20 p.m.

Moderated questions/discussion

Thursday, April 5 – Evening Events
The William and Ida Friday Center for Continuing Education

4:30–6:00 p.m.

Student poster sessions and photo exhibit

Evening Keynote Lecture

50th Annual Fred T. Foard Jr. Memorial Lecture

6–6:40 p.m.

The Story Of The Great Influenza Pandemic of 1918 and the Search for the Virus that Caused It


Gina Kolata

6:40-7 p.m.

Question-and-answer session

7-8 p.m.

Reception (with heavy hors d’oeuvres)

7-30 p.m.

Book signing
Gina Kolata will sign her book, Flu: The Story Of The Great Influenza Pandemic of 1918 and the Search for the Virus that Caused It


Friday, April 6
The William and Ida Friday Center for Continuing Education

Welcomes

8:30-8:45 a.m.

Wayne Holden, PhD, president and CEO, RTI International


Myron Cohen, MD, Yeargan-Bate Eminent Distinguished Professor of Medicine, microbiology and immunology; professor, epidemiology; director, Institute for Global Health and Infectious Diseases; associate vice chancellor for Global Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Resolve to Save Lives: Can Policies in the U.S. and Other Countries Make us Safer?

Session host and moderator: Leah M. Devlin, DDS, MPH, Professor of the Practice, Department of Health Policy and Management, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

8:45-9:05 a.m. (Remote, via teleconference)

“Regulations and Moratoria on Use of Particular Methods and Products in Studying Influenza”
Includes discussion of International Health Regulations, Global Health Security Agenda, role of WHO)


Tom Frieden, MD, MPH, president and CEO, RESOLVE; CDC director from 2009-2017

9:05-9:20 a.m.

Moderated discussion/questions

Medical Mistrust and Health Disparities: Origins and Impacts

Session host and moderator: TBD

9:20 -9:40 a.m.

“African-American Soldiers in WWI and its Aftermath”


Adriane Lentz-Smith, PhD, associate professor of history, Duke University; author of Freedom Struggles: African Americans and World War I

9:40-10 a.m.

“Building Trust in Vaccination Among Minority Populations” How trust and other factors affect response to vaccination and what can be done to increase trust


Sandra Crouse Quinn, PhD, professor, Department of Family Science; senior associate director, Maryland Center for Health Equity; School of Public Health; University of Maryland

10-10:15 a.m.

Moderated questions/discussion

10:15-10:35 a.m.

Break

Best Practices in Prevention and Preparedness

Session host and moderator: TBD

10:35-11:05 a.m.

“Hospital Preparedness and Responses to a Flu Epidemic” Managing surges, infection prevention for healthcare personnel, assuring full staffing, disinfection


David Weber, MD, MPH, UNC School of Medicine and the Gillings School

11:05-11:25 a.m.

“Best Communication Practices During Outbreaks” Communication methods, messages and communication with different populations; communicating uncertainty; considering rapidly changing information environment


Bridget Kelly, PhD, MPH, health communications research scientist; program manager, Science in the Public Sphere Program, RTI International

11:25-11:45 a.m.

“Local Public Health Preparedness and Responses to Flu and Other Emerging Infection Epidemics”


Zack Moore, MD, MPH, state epidemiologist for North Carolina; epidemiology section chief, Division of Public Health

11:45 a.m.-noon

Moderated questions/discussion

Imagining the Next Flu Pandemic – and Preventing it!

Moderator: Barbara K. Rimer, DrPH, dean and Alumni Distinguished Professor, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Noon-12:30 p.m.

“How Bad Could the Next Flu Pandemic Be, What Might it Look Like, and Will we be Ready?”


Ralph Baric, PhD, professor of epidemiology, Gillings School of Global Public Health; professor of microbiology and immunology, School of Medicine; University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

12:30-12:45 p.m.

Moderated questions/discussion and wrap-up