Category
Harness Big Data for Health, Well Being and the Environment

Study identifies novel gene loci for traits related to obesity

May 3, 2017 Drs. Anne Justice and Kari North are part of an international collaboration that explored whether and how smoking tobacco may alter one’s genetic susceptibility to obesity and distribution of body fat. Their study was published in Nature Communications.

Study confirms link between alcohol consumption, breast cancer risk in black women

May 1, 2017 Based on studies that primarily have included data from white women, alcohol consumption is a known risk factor for breast cancer. Now, a study co-authored by epidemiology doctoral student Lindsay Williams, Dr. Melissa Troester and others confirms the link between alcohol consumption and breast cancer risk for black women, an understudied group.

Maps in new UNC-led study show each state’s stroke risk factors at a glance

February 8, 2017 A new study led by Dr. Matthew Loop has produced data-rich maps of the United States that show the geographic distribution of key stroke-causing factors. On the maps, the Southeast, especially the states of Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi and Tennessee, display some of the highest prevalence of hypertension and diabetes among whites and blacks.

ESE researchers awarded large supercomputing grant from DOE

A team of researchers, including two UNC faculty members and an alumnus, has been awarded a large grant from the United States Department of Energy (DOE). Through the Innovative and Novel Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment program, they will receive 115 million core hours of use on the world’s third-fastest supercomputer.

JAMA study finds more patients obtain medications when they are prescribed electronically

A recent study published by JAMA Dermatology analyzed possible reasons why some patients do not fill prescriptions for dermatologic medications. Study researchers, including Elizabeth A. Suarez, doctoral student of epidemiology at the Gillings School, found that patients are more likely to obtain medications if they are prescribed in an electronic, rather than paper, format.