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Research News

Study finds reducing cadmium exposure during pregnancy may improve birth outcomes

Oct. 6, 2014 Reducing women’s exposure to cadmium during pregnancy likely would cut down on adverse outcomes such as preterm labor, low birth weight and early pregnancy loss, a new University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill study has found. In an article published July 30 online in the Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental… Read more »

NIH funds project to examine whether texts, games, Web portals can increase HPV vaccination rates

Sept. 24, 2014 Human papillomavirus (HPV), the most common sexually transmitted infection in the U.S., is known to cause various forms of cancer. Yet most HPV-associated cancers could be prevented with a vaccine that has been available since 2006. Why, then, are parents not eager to immunize their preteens – as they do for measles… Read more »

Study shows food and beverage companies exceed caloric cut pledge

Sept. 17, 2014 Sixteen of the world’s largest food and beverage producing companies pledged to help reduce obesity of American families with children two to 18 years old by pledging to eliminate 1 trillion calories from the products these companies sold in the marketplace by 2012, with 2007 as the baseline year, and 1.5 trillion… Read more »

Study considers how to increase health care enrollment for NC’s immigrants

Sept. 13, 2014 Sixty-one percent of immigrants in North Carolina have no health insurance coverage, yet the average monthly premium for insurance available through the Affordable Care Act’s health insurance marketplace is within the price range many immigrants thought would be affordable for themselves or their families, according to a new report from the University… Read more »

UNC partners with CDC to reduce violent deaths, injuries nationwide

Sept. 13, 2014 Each year, violence and unintentional injuries kill more Americans ages 1 to 44 years than any other cause. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention counts on researchers at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill to help prevent some of these injuries and fatalities. The CDC’s National Center for Injury… Read more »

UNC researchers study resistance to common anti-malaria drug in sub-Saharan Africa

Sept. 13, 2014 The spread of drug-resistant parasites in Southeast Asia could undermine artemisinin-based antimalarial therapies and imperil global malaria control. A consortium of investigators from nine endemic countries led by Jonathan Juliano, MD, assistant professor of medicine at the UNC School of Medicine and adjunct professor of epidemiology at the UNC Gillings School of… Read more »

Ribisl co-authors American Heart Association policy statement on e-cigarettes

Sept. 11, 2014 A policy statement newly released by the American Heart Association (AHA) says that electronic cigarettes, although safer than conventional cigarettes, pose a number of risks. The statement calls for continued monitoring of the health effects of electronic cigarettes, with special attention given to youth and adolescents. The AHA policy statement, published Aug…. Read more »

Hog workers carry drug-resistant bacteria even after leaving the farm

Sept. 9, 2014 A new study suggests that nearly half of workers who care for animals in large industrial hog farming operations may be carrying home livestock-associated bacteria in their noses, and that this potentially harmful bacteria remains with them up to four days after exposure. The study was led by Christopher D. Heaney, PhD,… Read more »

Diabetes drug does not increase short-term risk for pancreatic cancer, study finds

Aug. 29, 2014 A team of UNC researchers has found that drugs widely used to treat diabetes do not increase the short-term risk for pancreatic cancer. The report, “Dipeptidyl-peptidase-4 inhibitors and pancreatic cancer: a cohort study,” published online Aug. 11 and in the September print issue of Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism, was prepared by Mugdha… Read more »

Study provides recommendations to prevent hospital infections through hand hygiene

August 22, 2014 It seems so simple: To stop spreading infection, health-care workers must wash their hands. Yet even after 150 years of demonstrated reduction in health-care associated infections through hand hygiene, health-care workers who must wash their hands many times a day sometimes don’t do it. Perhaps there is no sink nearby, or they… Read more »