Category:

Epidemiology Research

New findings on genes, hypertension highlight importance of studying populations with African ancestry

May 17, 2017
A recent study identified three novel genomic regions related to hypertension susceptibility in individuals with African ancestry.

Study documents trends in food and beverage consumption by infants and toddlers

May 9, 2017
A new study by doctoral candidate Gandarvaka Miles calls for policy guidance and caretaker education to help infants and toddlers achieve healthy diets.

Physical activity helps to counteract weight gain from obesity-causing gene variant, study finds

May 4, 2017
To determine how physical activity and genetic variants related to obesity interact to affect weight gain, Dr. Misa Graff and colleagues performed genome-wide interaction meta-analyses using more than 200,000 individuals. The international study was published in PLOS Genetics.

Study identifies novel gene loci for traits related to obesity

May 3, 2017
Drs. Anne Justice and Kari North are part of an international collaboration that explored whether and how smoking tobacco may alter one’s genetic susceptibility to obesity and distribution of body fat. Their study was published in Nature Communications.

Study confirms link between alcohol consumption, breast cancer risk in black women

May 1, 2017
Based on studies that primarily have included data from white women, alcohol consumption is a known risk factor for breast cancer. Now, a study co-authored by epidemiology doctoral student Lindsay Williams, Dr. Melissa Troester and others confirms the link between alcohol consumption and breast cancer risk for black women, an understudied group.

Study finds small, mostly-male schools are less likely to have sexual assault policies

April 20, 2017
A new research paper highlights the wide variation in definitions of consent at universities across the United States.

New study explores timing of changes in blood pressure health that lead to larger disparities

April 20, 2017
African Americans and men are more likely to transition from ideal levels of blood pressure in childhood or early adulthood compared to white Americans and women, which puts them at increased risk of developing hypertension earlier in life.

Gillings researchers find further evidence that bats may be evolutionary source of MERS

April 13, 2017
A collaborative team including researchers from the Gillings School has found new evidence to support the hypothesis that the MERS coronavirus originated in bat populations.

Cancer burden will shift for people with HIV in US, study finds

April 6, 2017
Epidemiology doctoral student Jessica Islam worked with researchers at the NCI and CDC to find that the total number of HIV-positive cancer patients in the U.S. is projected to decrease through 2030. Islam and colleagues attribute the lowered cancer risk to widespread treatment with antiretroviral therapies.

Fourth annual GillingsX talks draw record crowd

March 27, 2017
The fourth annual GillingsX event, hosted by the Student Global Health Committee on March 23, highlighted students’ global health research experiences. The format is modeled after the TED talks, which aim to deliver an important idea in a short, interesting presentation.