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Health Behavior News

Powell’s NIH grant will address substance use in young adult black men

June 30, 2014 Wizdom Powell, PhD, assistant professor of health behavior at the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health, has received a National Institutes of Health grant to study how neighborhoods and daily stress affect substance abuse by black men. The five-year award is for $775,602. Powell’s research has focused upon a number of… Read more »

New studies examine e-cigarette availability, advertising effectiveness

June 27, 2014 Two new studies on e-cigarettes by researchers at UNC’s Gillings School of Global Public Health are among the first to examine the availability of these products nationwide and how advertisements are affecting consumer perceptions. Both were published in a special July issue of the journal Tobacco Control. The first study, “The availability… Read more »

Doctors not adequately informing patients of cancer screening pros and cons, study finds

June 25, 2014 Though cancer screening has come a long way, physicians still do not thoroughly discuss with patients the advantages and disadvantages of these procedures before decisions are made to undergo the screenings, according to a new study co-authored by a physician from The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s Gillings School of… Read more »

Clarence Pearson, alumnus and friend, dies at 89

May 31, 2014 Clarence Edward Pearson, MSPH, global health consultant and alumnus of UNC’s school of public health, now the Gillings School of Global Public Health, died May 24 in New York City. He was 89. “In losing Clarence, we have lost one of the ‘greats’ among our School’s alumni,” said Jo Anne Earp, ScD,… Read more »

Web-based and live counseling programs can reduce patients’ risk for heart disease

May 26, 2014 Web-based and live counseling programs effectively can reduce risk of heart disease for patients at high risk for the disease, and Web-based programs are particularly cost-effective, according to research from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The work, published online May 26 in JAMA Internal Medicine, adds to a growing… Read more »

Students awarded global internships — thanks to Gillings Global Gateway partners

May 19, 2014 Thirteen Gillings School of Global Public Health students will study and train abroad this summer, thanks to generous individuals and global organizations in the area. The students are Bernie Agala, Julia Brasileiro, Caitlin Fross, Chrissy Godwin, Brianne Kallam, Smisha Kaysin, Tori Lebrun, Emily Mangone, Emily Nicholson, Kathryn Peebles, Kate Sheahan, Caitlin Snyder… Read more »

Health behavior student will use Fulbright to address children’s malnutrition in Sierra Leone

April 29, 2014 Lacey English, Master of Public Health student in health behavior at the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health, is one of 13 University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill students who have thus far received a Fulbright Grant for work and study abroad during the 2014-2015 award period. English will study… Read more »

Study finds health disparities among North Carolina’s sexual minorities

April 23, 2014 A study by researchers at UNC’s Gillings School of Global Public Health offers the first statewide evidence that lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) people in North Carolina have poorer health than their straight counterparts in the state. The disparities are reported in “A Profile of North Carolina Lesbian, Gay and Bisexual Health… Read more »

Four public health students win Graduate School’s Impact Award for research that benefits North Carolina

Graduate School also honors other public health awardees April 22, 2014 Four of the 20 students recognized by UNC’s Graduate School for research that has impact upon the people of North Carolina are students at the Gillings School of Global Public Health. A fifth student, an advisee of epidemiology professor Ralph Baric, PhD, is affiliated… Read more »

Older women with breast cancer experience temporary declines in health-related quality of life

March 28, 2014 A new study finds that women 65 and older who are treated for breast cancer initially experience declines in physical and mental health, compared to similar women without cancer, but the declines generally wane after 12 months. The findings imply that older women should be informed they are more vulnerable to declines… Read more »