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Epidemiology News

Researchers find variance in controlled substance prescription monitoring programs aimed at reducing overdose deaths

June 18, 2014 A new study finds that controlled substance prescription monitoring programs (PMPs) aimed at reducing drug overdose deaths vary tremendously by state and across time. The researchers, all with connections to UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health, found that while every state requires that prescriptions for controlled substances must be reported to… Read more »

EPID alumna Gilboa wins prize at George Washington University

June 10, 2014 Suzanne Meredith Gilboa, PhD, Gillings School alumna and epidemiologist at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, received the 2013 Arthur S. Flemming Award from George Washington University’s Trachtenberg School of Public Policy and Public Administration. Gilboa received the award for her accomplishments as… Read more »

Most breast cancer patients may not be getting enough exercise

June 9, 2014 Physical activity after breast cancer diagnosis has been linked with prolonged survival and improved quality of life, but most participants in a large breast cancer study did not meet national physical activity guidelines after they were diagnosed. Moreover, African-American women were less likely to meet the guidelines than were white women. Published… Read more »

African-American women and those insured by Medicaid less likely to receive endocrine therapy to prevent breast cancer recurrence

June 6, 2014 New research by Stephanie B. Wheeler, PhD, and colleagues reveals that breast cancer patients insured by Medicaid and African-American breast cancer patients are less likely to receive life-saving endocrine therapy (ET) to prevent cancer recurrence. Wheeler,  assistant professor of health policy and management at UNC’s Gillings School of Global Public Health and… Read more »

Web-based and live counseling programs can reduce patients’ risk for heart disease

May 26, 2014 Web-based and live counseling programs effectively can reduce risk of heart disease for patients at high risk for the disease, and Web-based programs are particularly cost-effective, according to research from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The work, published online May 26 in JAMA Internal Medicine, adds to a growing… Read more »

Inaugural UNC public health MOOC hailed as great success

May 20, 2014 What is a MOOC, and can I have one? Hint: It isn’t one of these: A book designed to look like a magazine or a contemptible person (Random House) A slang term for the hordes of standard-issue, disposable bad guys in written or filmed heroic fantasy mowed down with impunity by The… Read more »

Study examines how dangerous respiratory viruses circumvent body’s defenses

May 20, 2014 Researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill are studying how some of the most dangerous viruses on the planet tailor their defenses to get around the body’s immune system. The study, published online May 20 in mBio, the journal of the American Society for Microbiology, could contribute to a better… Read more »

Commencement celebrates alumna, faculty awardees, our students

Nicole Bates is keynote speaker; Wing and Margolis receive Larsh, McGavran awards May 10, 2014 There was a lot to celebrate when the Gillings School held its 74th spring commencement on Saturday, May 10. The ceremony, which began at 1 p.m. in the Carmichael Arena on the UNC campus, featured a keynote address by a… Read more »

Young adults at risk for suicide when taking high doses of SSRI antidepressants

May 1, 2014 Antidepressant therapy has long been associated with increased risk of suicide in people under 25. There has not been a clear reason why some drugs are more likely than others to have this result and why only a subset of the young adult population is vulnerable. A collaboration of researchers at The… Read more »

Immunological study of deadly coronavirus in the Middle East offers hope of vaccine and treatment

April 30, 2014 About forty percent of the people who contract the newly emerging Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) will die during the course of the infection.  Given the recent increase of diagnosed cases in the Middle East (which recently has surged above 400 cases) and the lack of vaccines and therapeutics, researchers are… Read more »