May 5, 2014

Public health champions in North Carolina and the world!
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Environmental sciences and engineering doctoral candidate Anne Galyean not only is forging new paths in nanochemistry — she's also a world-class downhill mountain biker.

Environmental sciences and engineering doctoral candidate Anne Galyean not only is forging new paths in nanochemistry — she’s also a world-class downhill mountain biker.

Your experiences here prepare you to solve the world’s greatest public health problems. You will be the leaders who must get water to billions, turn the tide on the obesity epidemic, figure out how to get quality health care to all people, reduce the incidence of cancer and infectious diseases and so much more. You’re amazing! I’m impressed by what you accomplish while you’re here and by your dreams for the future.

— Barbara K. Rimer, DrPH

 

Creative. Innovative. Dedicated. Focused.

These are just a few of the adjectives that describe Gillings students. Of note are:

Lacey English, health behavior master's student, received a Fulbright fellowship to address children's malnutrition in Sierra Leone next year.

Lacey English, health behavior master’s student, received a Fulbright fellowship to address children’s malnutrition in Sierra Leone next year.

  • Our local and global entrepreneurs, including Dr. Nabarun Dasgupta, Alice Wang, Liz Morris, Allison Myers and Liz Chen, who respectively have labored on behalf of preventing deaths from prescription opioid use, delivering clean drinking water, providing portable devices to improve sanitation, counteracting the sale of tobacco products, and educating about sexual behavior and diseases;
  • Researchers who tackle problems in local communities to improve health in North Carolina and globally;
  • Health policy and management students, who consistently win prizes in case competitions, applying classroom lessons to real-life challenges in hospitals and other health-related settings; and
  • All our students, who through capstone and other partnerships with community individuals and agencies, use their heads, hands and hearts to educate, serve and make others’ lives better.

 

 

 

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Paul Gilbert (health behavior)

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Lindsey Haynes-Maslow (health policy and management)

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Cynthia Lin (epidemiology)

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Jennifer Poti (nutrition)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Each year, competition is fierce for the prestigious University-wide Impact Awards, and this year, public health students received four of twenty presented. We’re proud of the 2014 awardees (above). Awardee Kari Debbink (microbiology and immunology, not pictured) works in Dr. Ralph Baric’s lab at the Gillings School.

 

Jennifer Moore, Christopher Coughlin and Callan Blough (l-r) took first prize at the University of Alabama at Birmingham case competition this year, an event at which our HPM students are usually finalists.

Jennifer Moore, Christopher Coughlin and Callan Blough

Jennifer Moore, Christopher Coughlin and Callan Blough (l-r) took first prize at the University of Alabama at Birmingham case competition this year, an event at which our HPM students are usually finalists.

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Sally Bogus, Cleveland Clinic chief executive officer Dr. Delos Cosgrove, Daniel Douthit and Alison Cary-Coleman

Sally Bogus, Cleveland Clinic chief executive officer Dr. Delos Cosgrove, Daniel Douthit and Alison Cary-Coleman

Sally Bogus, Cleveland Clinic chief executive officer Dr. Delos Cosgrove, Daniel Douthit and Alison Cary-Coleman (l-r) celebrate the students’ first-place win at the inaugural Cleveland Clinic Case Competition in Ohio.

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03 - BIOS - ENAR winners

Biostatistics students Thomas Stewart, Qian Liu, Xiaoxi Liu, Ai (Andy) Ni, Fang-Shu Ou and Jing Zhou

Biostatistics students Thomas Stewart, Qian Liu, Xiaoxi Liu, Ai (Andy) Ni, Fang-Shu Ou and Jing Zhou (l-r) received awards for their research at the spring meeting of the International Biometric Society’s Eastern North American Region (ENAR).

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A gift from alumna Deniese Chaney (standing, right) and her husband Edward provided Gillings students with a comfortable, vibrant, technologically equipped collaboration and study space.

A gift from alumna Deniese Chaney (standing, right) and her husband Edward provided Gillings students with a comfortable, vibrant, technologically equipped collaboration and study space. Chaney is principal at Accenture Health and Public Service. Behind her is the School’s glass-walled 21st-century classroom, where students enjoy natural lighting and have access to cutting-edge technological tools.


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Carolina Public Health is a publication of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Gillings School of Global Public Health. To view previous issues, please visit sph.unc.edu/cph.