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Carolina Global Breastfeeding Institute (CGBI)
CGBI: MHCH Courses

Survey Course on Breastfeeding and Public Health (MHCH 605 – Spring)*

In this survey course, students will explore human lactation and breastfeeding as nested within the reproductive health continuum. The biocultural aspects of maternal and child perinatal health in the “first 1,000 days” – from conception to an infant’s second birthday – will be examined using evolutionary, cross-cultural, and global health perspectives. Students will also discover the ways in which pregnancy, birthing practices, and infant care shape infant feeding strategies, growth, development and maternal and child health across the life course.

Other topics include human reproductive ecology; complementary feeding and weaning; nutrition and immunology; early human development; infant sleep; alloparenting, adoption, and surrogacy; medicalization of pregnancy, birth, and infant feeding; donor human milk banking; milk sharing; and global health policies and practices related to infant and young child feeding. Emerging topics in research, ethics, communications, and advocacy will be addressed. The course is taught in seminar style with a combination of instructor lectures, student peer teaching and learning activities, and guest speakers.

The following competencies and corresponding skills are addressed:

  • Analytic Assessment Policy Development
  • Program Planning
  • Communication
  • Cultural Competency
  • Community Dimensions of Practice.

Special Topics: Humanitarian Maternal and Child Health (MHCH 890 – 001)*

UN Humanitarian Chief Visits MyanmarHumanitarian emergencies are natural disasters, anthropogenic disasters, or a combination of both that pose threats to the health, safety, security of person, or well-being of a community. Humanitarian emergencies that involve conflict, natural disasters, communicable diseases, and displacement have important health implications. Women and children are disproportionately affected by humanitarian crises. In this special topics seminar, students will study critical issues facing pregnant women, post-partum mothers and their newborns, and young children (under the age of 2) in emergencies using public health and human rights frameworks. Through engagement with content relating to both theoretical knowledge and practical examples from recent disasters, students will identify the unique needs of mothers and infants in emergencies and critically assess various intervention strategies that have been put into place to meet these needs. Key questions that the course addresses are: What are the perinatal maternal, newborn, and young child health needs humanitarian crises? What responses are available to meet the health needs of this special population that have maximum impact? How can we be more prepared to respond to their needs in the future and support resilience to future crises?

Topics will include: the critical health needs of pregnant women, post-partum mothers and newborns, and infants and young children (under 2) in humanitarian crises; challenges of perintatal maternal, newborn, and young child health care delivery in crisis situations; humanitarian principles, coordination mechanisms, and codes of conduct; historic, current, and emergent trends in humanitarian health; ethical considerations for research, practice, and monitoring and evaluating programs.

The following competencies and corresponding skills are addressed:

Global Health Concentration Competencies:

  • Analyze how the roles, relationships, and resources of entities influencing global health policies and practices affect disparities in health outcomes
  • Apply ethical approaches in global health research and practice.

Maternal, Child, and Family Health Competencies:

  • Critically analyze determinants of health among infants, children, adolescents, women, mothers, and families, including biological, behavioral, socioeconomic, demographic, cultural, and health care systems influences across the life course.

Clinical Support for Breastfeeding (MHCH 765)**

MHCH 765 is the first of two courses required for MRT-TI, and is considered a master’s level course. MHCH 765 is offered in the fall semester only. The course is structured to provide supervised breastfeeding support education in the context of clinical lactation services and public health practice. Students receive didactic and clinical training, and begin earning the required 300 clinical hours and 90 didactic hours required for program completion and to comply with the requirements of an IBLCE Approved Pathway Two Program. The clinical component of the course takes a phased approach to learning. The student will begin with observation of couplet care and will then move to a clinical practice experience that allows for the student to become more involved while continuing under the direct supervision of a clinical instructor by the end of the semester. Students will be primarily with IBCLCs serving as program Clinical Instructors, but will also be required to have clinical experiences at off-site locations and will learn from others that are non-faculty IBCLCs, nutrition and/or breastfeeding professionals and para-professionals, and/or breastfeeding advocates. In the classroom setting, students will begin to be exposed to lecture content that will assist them in laying a solid foundation in Lactation and Public Health in a manner that allows them to transfer the didactic content into their clinical experiences when applicable.

Clinical Support for Breastfeeding II (MHCH 766)**

MHCH 766 is the second of two courses required for the program, and is considered a master’s level course. MHCH 766 is offered in the spring semester only. The course is structured to provide supervised breastfeeding support education in the context of clinical lactation services and public health practice. Students receive didactic and clinical training, and begin earning the required 300 clinical hours and 90 didactic hours required for program completion and to comply with the requirements of an IBLCE Approved Pathway Two Program. The clinical component of the course takes a phased approach to learning. The student will begin with observation of couplet care and will then move to a clinical practice experience that allows for the student to become more involved while continuing under the direct supervision of a clinical instructor by the end of the course. Students will be primarily with IBCLCs serving as program Clinical Instructors, but will also be required to have clinical experiences at off-site locations and will learn from others that are non-faculty IBCLCs, nutrition and/or breastfeeding professionals and para-professionals, and/or breastfeeding advocates. In the classroom setting, students will begin to be exposed to lecture content that will assist them in laying a solid foundation in Lactation and Public Health in a manner that allows them to transfer the didactic content into their clinical experiences when applicable.

*Approved residential Global Health graduate certificate elective


**Must have enrollment approval and be admitted to MRT-TI

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