Category

Maternal and Child Health Research

Linking maternal mortality files to violent death reporting system reveals more pregnancy-associated suicides, homicides

A recent study co-authored by Anna Austin, doctoral student of maternal and child health, and Dr. Catherine Vladutiu, Gillings School alumna and adjunct faculty member in epidemiology, revealed that violent deaths occurring during pregnancy and up to one year postpartum are under-reported. Linking traditional maternal mortality surveillance system records with the North Carolina Violent Death Reporting System captured 55.6 percent more pregnancy-associated violent deaths than traditional surveillance alone.

Care4Moms project to address needs of mothers with medically fragile babies

July 27, 2016 An interdisciplinary team of researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has received nearly $900,000 in federal funding to identify and address the needs of mothers with medically fragile infants. The funding will support Care4Moms, a three-year study of this vastly understudied group. Researchers will collect data on the... Read more »

Researchers confirm link between schistosomiasis and HIV acquisition

March 31, 2016 A comprehensive review of secondary data sources has confirmed a long-suspected link between female genital schistosomiasis (FGS) and HIV infection for women in southern Africa. A researcher from the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health was one of two co-authors of the resulting article, titled “Association Between Schistosoma haematobium Exposure and... Read more »