From health-care providers, announcements do more than conversations to improve HPV vaccination rates

In an effort to increase uptake of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination, researchers at UNC evaluated the effectiveness of training health-care providers either to make presumptive announcements about the vaccine or to engage in participatory conversations with families. Study results showed that only the announcement training led to a meaningful increase in vaccine initiation.

Giving women HIV self-tests promotes male partner testing

Providing pregnant and postpartum women in sub-Saharan Africa with multiple HIV self-tests can make it more likely their male partners will be tested for HIV, found a study led by Dr. Harsha Thirumurthy of the health policy and management department.

New study brings awareness to overlooked immigration issues around higher education

In a recent study, researchers from the Departments of Health Behavior and Maternal and Child Health investigated how youth in North Carolina can be “locked out” of educational opportunities through complicated immigration policy.

Study raises concerns about timely follow-up to positive mammogram for the uninsured

Uninsured women under age 65 who received their mammogram at community screening clinics in North Carolina were less likely to get follow-up within a year of a positive mammogram, according to a study led by senior author Louise Henderson, PhD, adjunct assistant professor of epidemiology.

Study finds daily self-monitoring of weight and activity helps prevent weight gain among breast cancer survivors

A recent study co-authored by Drs. Carmina Valle and Deborah Tate of the Gillings School found that daily self-monitoring of both weight and activity may be a feasible and accessible approach to promote weight gain prevention in breast cancer survivors.

Study identifies most persuasive messages for parents considering HPV vaccine

Researchers from the Gillings School and UNC's Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center have identified which messages are most likely to motivate parents to get the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination for their children. The findings support physicians’ use of specific statements to increase uptake of the cancer-preventing vaccine series.

Health behavior students awarded record $325K to teach health education through technology

Elizabeth Chen, MPH, and Cristina Leos, MSPH, health behavior doctoral students at the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health, have won a $325,000 award from Innovation Next, a program of the National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy. The award is the largest ever made to a student or a student group at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

UNC’s Gillings School number one public school of public health for NIH funding

September 7, 2016 Once again, the University of North Carolina’s Gillings School of Global Public Health is the number one public school of public health when it comes to funding... Read more »

A majority of parents would support schools’ requiring HPV vaccinations, as long as there are opt-outs, survey finds

August 25, 2016 A national survey found that parents were more likely to agree that laws requiring students to be vaccinated against HPV for school entry are a “good idea”... Read more »

UNC’s Endeavors magazine highlights Gillings School researchers

August 18, 2016 Endeavors, the online magazine highlighting research and creative activity at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, featured six Gillings School of Global Public Health researchers... Read more »

...
10
11
12
1
8
9
13
14
15
...
RELATED PAGES
CONTACT INFORMATION
Visit our communications and marketing team page.
Contact sphcomm@unc.edu with any media inquiries or general questions.

Communications and Marketing Office
125 Rosenau Hall
CB #7400
135 Dauer Drive
Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7400