Rosen publishes research on HIV infection in N.C. prisons

July 09, 2009
A UNC study led by David Rosen, PhD, has found that 3.4 percent of inmates evaluated in North Carolina prisons test positive for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and as many as 61 percent of HIV cases in prison settings may remain undetected. Those at highest risk for HIV infection include men who have sex with men and non-whites.

Dr. David Rosen (center) with colleagues Dr. Carol Golin and Dr. Vic Schoenbach

Dr. David Rosen (center) with colleagues Dr. Carol Golin and Dr. Vic Schoenbach

Rosen and colleagues at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s Gillings School of Global Public Health and School of Medicine published their findings in an article in American Journal of Public Health (June 2009). The paper also has been selected by the Guttmacher Institute’s journal, Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health, to appear in summary form in the “Digests” section of its September 2009 issue.

Rosen, who received his doctorate in epidemiology from UNC’s public health school in 2007, is now completing a medical degree at UNC.

The article, titled “Characteristics and Behaviors Associated With HIV Infection Among Inmates in the North Carolina Prison System,” was part of Rosen’s dissertation research.

Co-authors of the article include Victor J. Schoenbach, PhD, associate professor of epidemiology, and Paul W. Stewart, PhD, research associate professor of biostatistics, in the Gillings School of Global Public Health; Carol E. Golin, MD, associate professor of medicine and health behavior and health education in the schools of medicine and public health; and David A.Wohl, MD, and Becky L. White, MD, clinical assistant professors of medicine and co-directors of HIV Services at the N.C. Dept. of Corrections’ Division of Prisons.

 

UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health contact: Ramona DuBose, director of communications, (919) 966-7467 or ramona_dubose@unc.edu.