Certificates in Global Health

Photo by Joe Brown

Through a project titled, ‘Globalization of the Curriculum,’ we integrate global health content across the core MPH course curriculum and departmental-based core courses. Students who wish to have the equivalent of a minor may do so through a Residential Certificate in Global Health.  We offer two types of Certificates in Global Health:

Residential Graduate Certificate in Global Health

Online Global Health Certificate

Residential Graduate Certificate in Global Health

The Residential Graduate Certificate in Global Health complements currently enrolled graduate students’ departmental requirements by offering courses and seminars that provide a comprehensive understanding of global health conditions, needs and solutions that cross borders in both developing and industrialized countries.

 

More information about the Residential Graduate Certificate in Global Health can be found below.

Online Global Health Certificate

The Online Global Health Certificate is for working health professionals around the world. The online certificate is a formal academic certificate for non-degree seeking students that examine complexities inherent in improving health on a global scale.

 
 
More information about the Online Global Health Certificate can be found here.

 

Residential Graduate Certificate in Global Health

The Graduate Certificate in Global Health is open to students currently enrolled in a residential graduate degree program of the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health. Students enrolled in graduate degree programs of other units at UNC may apply after meeting with a representative of the Global Gateway. Please email the Global Gateway to set up an interview at globalgateway@unc.edu.

In conferring a global health certificate, UNC’s school of public health acknowledges students’ capability and capacity to perform as public health professionals with a global perspective and with collaborative and cross-cultural sensitivity and skills.

Communication

  • Communicate global health information in diverse settings.
  • Utilize appropriate technologies and forms of communication with global and diverse audiences.

Diversity & Cultural Competency

  • Analyze a global health problem in an interdisciplinary manner in order to:
    • Develop interventions
    • Evaluate programs
    • Develop and implement policies, and
    • Contribute to the knowledge base of global health research
  • Extend cultural understanding and skills to global and diverse settings related to populations such as refugees, immigrants, and migrant workers.
  • Adapt and work effectively in countries and cultures that challenge one’s physical, social and economic perspective or comfort level.

Professionalism & Ethics

  • Analyze global health disparities through a social justice and human rights lens.
  • Understand and analyze the roles and agendas of major players in global health.

Systems Thinking

  • Analyze the complex tapestry and interaction of social, economic, political, and environmental systems that affect global health.

Click on each tab heading to review specific information.

Click on each requirement for earning the Residential Graduate Certificate in Global Health:

1. Graduate-level global health-related courses, totaling a minimum of 10 credit hours*

a) One foundation course/required course, either HPM 664/MHCH 664, Globalization and Health (3 credits) OR PUBH 510, Interdisciplinary Perspectives in Global Health (3 credits). Starting in Fall 2015, PUBH 711, Critical Issues in Global Health, will count as a foundation course (PUBH 510 will most likely not be offered in 2015). *The foundation course cannot count towards your degree credit requirement.*

b) Two semesters of the Global Health Discussion Series (PUBH 500, 1/2 credit hour each semester); Selection of two semesters of monthly Global Health Discussion Series. Attendance is required at a minimum of 4 out of the 5 scheduled evenings each semester. See “Discussion Series (PUBH 500)” tab for more information. *The Global Health Discussion Series cannot count towards your degree credit requirement.*

c) Additional elective global health courses. The “Courses” tab provides a list of currently approved School of Public Health courses with global health content. This is not an exhaustive list of available courses, as new courses are continually being added and there are courses across UNC which might qualify toward the Certificate. If you are interested in taking a course not on the list below, please email the syllabus to globalgateway@unc.edu to let us determine if it will qualify toward the Certificate program.

  • We encourage you to conduct an international practicum, but practicum courses and credit hours do not count as an elective or toward the required 10 credits.
  • Students are encouraged to improve their language proficiency, but language courses cannot be counted as an elective or toward the 10 credit hours since you cannot earn graduate credit for language courses.
  • It should be noted that courses may have prerequisites at the instructor’s discretion, and such requirements would apply to Certificate students in the same manner as they would to other students. Enrollment in the Certificate program does not guarantee entry into courses, so students should plan carefully and register early.

*The Graduate School policy regarding students working toward a Certificate and degree concurrently: The total number of academic credits transferred shall not exceed 40% of the total required for a Certificate. Only 4 credits can be counted towards your degree and the Residential Certificate in Global Health. The remaining 6 global health credits (foundation course, PUBH500, and 2 other global health credits)  that fulfill the Residential Certificate in Global Health credit requirement cannot be counted towards your degree requirements.

2. Master's paper/PhD thesis should have a global health focus

If required by your department degree program, your master’s paper, dissertation, capstone, or equivalent deliverable should have a focus on a global health issue, problem, or concern and should be negotiated with the departmental academic advisor.

a) If you paper/thesis is on a domestic topic, you must include significant global health content (5-10 pages for master’s paper, 10-15 pages for Ph.D. thesis) in the copy turned in to the Global Gateway.

b) If your final project/master’s paper is a group project (e.g. HBHE), you must submit the group project report as well as a separate document (5-10 pages) applying your topic in a global setting (individual project, not group work).

3. Attendance at local global health related events (at least 1 per semester):

a) Monthly seminars sponsored by the Global Gateway.

b) Global Health Brown Bag lunches sponsored by the Student Global Health Committee

c) Global health events at other local universities or in the community

The courses below have been approved by the Global Gateway for the Residential Graduate Certificate in Global Health (not the Online Global Health Certificate). Please refer to the requirements when selecting your courses.

Course List- Click on each subject to view courses

Required Courses
Foundation courses (PUBH 510 and HPM 664/MCH 664) fulfill the core course requirement. Select one of the two to fulfill the requirement. Starting in Fall 2015 PUBH 711 will fulfill the core course requirement (PUBH 510 will likely not be offered in Fall 2015). PUBH 500 is the discussion series and is required of all students.

Interdisciplinary Perspectives in Global Health (PUBH 510) 3 credit hours. Bentley and Sackey Harris, Fall: Wednesday, 12:30-2:50pm (will likely not be offered in Fall 2015). The course explores contemporary issues, problems, and controversies in global health through an interdisciplinary perspective; examines the complex tapestry of social, economic, political, and environmental factors that affect global health; analyzes global health disparities through a social justice and human rights lens; analyzes the roles and agendas of major players in global health; looks at the link between global and local health issues; and exposes students to opportunities in global health work and research.

Critical Issues in Global Health (PUBH 711)- *Counts starting in Fall 2015- 3 credit hours. Ramaswamy, Fall: Online course. The course explores contemporary issues, problems, and controversies in global health through an interdisciplinary perspective; examines the complex tapestry of social, economic, political, and environmental factors that affect global health; analyzes global health disparities through a social justice and human rights lens; and exposes students to opportunities in global health work and research.

Globalization and Health (HPM 664/MCH 664) 3 credit hours. Fried, Spring: Tuesdays 12:30-2:50 pm. The course examines multiple dimensions of globalization and explores their direct and indirect effects on determinants of health through presentations, case studies, class discussions and interactive sessions, small group seminars, readings, weekly written assignments, a critical book review, and a final paper and poster session. An expected outcome of the course is that students will gain a deeper understanding of how the changes and transformations of globalization and development affect health, and will have examined responses and approaches to current and projected global patterns that contribute to positive and adverse health effects, and health inequalities.

Discussion Series (PUBH 500) .5 credit hours. Fried. The course meets in the evening for 1.5 hours, five times a semester. Each session in the series will address a unique topic and might include presentations, screening and discussion of a documentary, discussion of a news report, discussion of a book chapter or article, or attending a special campus speaker’s presentation or event.

Biostatistics

BIOS 670 - Demographic Techniques I (3). Suchindran, Bilsborrow, Fall
Source and interpretation of demographic data; rates and ratios, standardization, complete and abridged life tables; estimation and projection of fertility, mortality, migration, and population composition.

BIOS 771 - Demographic Techniques II (3). Suchindran, Spring
Life table techniques; methods of analysis when data are deficient; population projection methods; interrelations among demographic variables; migration analysis; uses of population models.

Environmental Sciences & Engineering
ENVR 421* - Environmental Health Microbiology (3). Sobsey, Alternate Springs.
Prerequisite, introductory course in microbiology or permission of the instructor. Presentation of the microbes of public health importance in water, food, and air, including their detection, occurrence, transport, and survival in the environment; epidemiology and risks from environmental exposure. Two lecture and two laboratory hours per week.
* This course only meets the global health certificate requirements if taught by Dr. Mark Sobsey as a residential course. If there is another instructor, you must get approval from the Office of Global Health.

ENVR 471 (001) - Water, Sanitation, Hygiene, and Global Health (3). Bartram, Sobsey, Spring
Water, sanitation and hygiene (‘WaSH’) are significant causes of preventable disease and account for around 10% of the global burden of disease. In developing countries the proportion of the burden of disease attributed to WaSH is greater and WaSH is therefore the target of international policy. In developed countries the proportion of disease burden is less, although background and outbreaks of disease continue, and WaSH is the target of regulatory and policy action. It is hoped that this course will attract students with diverse backgrounds and enrolled in different programmes; and that this diversity will lead to a rewarding learning experience. Some students will already be familiar with subjects covered in some sessions and will be expected to contribute
accordingly. Pre- or co-requisites: ENVR 401, 430, 421 or equivalent (non-ENVR students: permission of course instructor required)

ENVR 685 – Water and Sanitation Planning and Policy in Developing Countries (3). Whittington, Alternate Springs
Prerequisite, permission of the instructor. Seminar on policy and planning approaches for providing improved community water and sanitation services in developing countries. Topics covered include the choice of appropriate technology and level of service; pricing, metering, and connection charges; cost recovery and targeting subsidies to the poor; water vending; community participation in the management and operation of water systems; and rent-seeking behavior in the provision of water supplies.

ENVR 755 - Analysis of Water Resource Systems (3). Characklis, Fall
Permission of the instructor for nonmajors. Use of mathematical models to design and evaluate regional water supply and treatment systems. Engineering and economic methods are incorporated into quantitative analyses of regional scenarios. Social and political aspects also discussed.

ENVR 785 - Public Investment Theory (City and Regional Planning 785, Public Policy 785) (3). Whittington, Alternate Springs
Prerequisite, PLAN 210 or equivalent. Basic theory, process, and techniques of public investment planning and decision making, involving synthesis of economic, political, and technologic aspects. Theory underlying benefit-cost analysis, adaption to a descriptive and normative model for planning public projects and programs.

ENVR 890 (Section 001) - Sanitation in Developing Countries (3) – Kolsky, Fall
This is a course on Sanitation in Developing Countries of interest to undergrads, grads. No prerequisites.

ENVR 890 (Section 005) – Environmental Health Inequalities: A Global Perspective – Woods, Fall
In this course, students will learn how social, economic and political factors impact environment health outcomes and will be introduced to theories and methods for incorporating social determinants frameworks into environmental health research. These frameworks will help explain why climate change, urbanization, industrialization and war often have the worst health and environmental impacts on the poorest countries and/or the poorest people in a given country. Students will also learn about the environmental justice movement in the US and its role in advancing how underserved communities around the world advocate for greater environmental regulations. Finally, we will explore strategies for improving global health governance and promoting ethical economic development.
Epidemiology

EPID 690 (Section 003) - Problems in Epidemiology: Emerging & Re-Emerging Infectious Diseases (3) – Stamm (Not currently offered)
Overview of basic principles of infectious diseases, focusing on emerging and re-emerging infectious disease agents that affect public health. Includes and introduction to the biology of viruses, bacteria, eucaryotic parasites, and host responses. Prerequisites: undergraduate biology and chemistry.
Note – this was formerly a 4-credit course listed as EPID 751. It is now 3-credits.

EPID 752 - Methods in Infectious Disease Epidemiology (3). Weber, Fall (Not currently offered)
Prerequisites: Introductory epidemiology and biostatistics. Course will focus on methodology, public health concerns, patterns of transmission, and “newly” discovered infections. Will focus on diseases in developed countries, especially the United States. Methods for studying infectious diseases are emphasized including host defenses, surveillance, outbreak investigations, study design, new and emerging infections, and control. Lecture topics include malaria, SARS, sexually transmitted diseases in lesser developed countries, and polio and measles eradication.

EPID 754 - Mathematical Modeling of Infectious Diseases (3). Van Rie, Spring
Introduction to basic methods for analysis and interpretation of epidemiological data on infectious diseases and for predicting the impact of control programs such as HIV prevention programs and vaccination strategies.

EPID 756 - Control of Infectious Diseases in Developing Countries (3). Pettifor, Meshnick, Fall
Epidemiology of the major infectious diseases in developing countries. Understanding surveillance, prevention and control strategies appropriate for poor countries. Special attention paid to water-bourne diseases, tuberculosis, malaria, and helminthiases.

EPID 757 - Epidemiology of HIV/AIDS in Developing Countries (3). Weir, Fall
This course examines the epidemiology of AIDS from an international perspective. It considers the AIDS pandemic in a broad epidemiology perspective, including key aspects of basic, clinical, and social science.

EPID 785 - Environmental Epidemiology (3). Spring
Epidemiologic ideas and methods applied to evaluation and control of human health consequences of environmental hazards. Pollution of environmental media and global change are considered from a human-ecological perspective, with local and international examples.

EPID 826 - Infection/Inequality – Thomas (Not currently offered)
Types of inequalities; how nature of infection accentuates inequalities; social causes of unequal infection rates; measuring infection rates and social contributors; inequality as an ethical issue; interventions to lessen inequalities.

EPID 898 - Global Health Ethics Seminar (2). Behets, Rennie, Fall [supported by the Bioethics, Social Justice and Global Health program]
This course explores current bioethical concerns, dilemmas, and controversies in international health research from an interdisciplinary perspective; examines how bioethics issues in resource-poor countries are linked with issues of social justice; gives those involved in international research an opportunity to share their experiences of ethical problems in the field; connects research ethics questions with ‘big picture’ issues of international relations and global inequity; seeks creative solutions to ethical problems responsive to both international norms and local circumstances.

Health Behavior

HBEH 706Effective Training for Global Health (1). Randall-David, Turner
This participatory course provides an overview of adult learning and empowerment education principles, effective training methods and cultural competence for global health. Students will gain marketable skills in training assessments, activity and course design, creating a productive learning environment, facilitation and evaluation applied to diverse global health topics, audiences and settings. In teams, students will design on a one-day public health workshop on a topic and for an international audience of their choosing and develop and facilitate a short activity from that workshop. They will incorporate feedback from co-learners and reflect on their experiences to promote their learning and improve their training and design skills. The instructors provide a wealth of resources and recommendations from decades of experience designing and facilitating training courses around the world.

HBHE 753 Qualitative Evaluation and Research Methods (3). Maman, Spring
Permission required for non-majors. Theoretical and methodological approaches of applied medical anthropology for health program development and evaluation. Field methods for collecting and analyzing data through observation, interviewing, group methods and case studies.

HBHE 754 Advanced Qualitative Methods in Health Behavior and Health Research (3). Barrington, Fall
Prerequisite HBHE 753 or equivalent. This course provides advanced graduate students in public health and related fields the opportunity to explore different analytic approaches and techniques and develop analysis and writing skills. Students will apply methods they learn to analyze, interpret and write-up the results of their own qualitative research.

HBHE 756 Social and Peer Support in Health: An Ecological and Global Perspective (3). Fisher, Spring

HBHE 815 Foundations of Health Behavior I (3). Muessig, Fall

(Global health module only counts towards the certificate)

Health Policy & Management
HPM 472 - Program Evaluation. Paul, Spring
Concepts and methods of the program evaluation paradigm as applied in health administration. This course only meets the global health certificate requirements if taught by Dr. John Paul as a residential course. If there is another instructor, you must get approval from the Office of Global Health.

HPM 660 - International and Comparative Health Systems (3). Fried, Harris, Fall
Methods of comparing health systems, examinations of related national health systems and analysis of related high prevalence health issues.

HPM 664 - Crosslisted as MHCH 664 Globalization and Health (3). Fried, Spring
*This is one of two courses students can take to fulfill the foundation course requirement for the Global Health Certificate Program.
The course examines multiple dimensions of globalization and explores their direct and indirect effects on determinants of health through presentations, case studies, class discussions, small group seminars, readings, weekly written assignments, a critical book review, and a final paper and poster session. An expected outcome of the course is that students will gain a deeper understanding of how the changes and transformations of globalization and development affect health, and will have examined responses and approaches to current global patterns that contribute to positive and adverse health effects, and health inequalities.

HPM 715* - Health Economics for Policy and Management (3). Thirumurthy, Fall
Prerequisite, BIOS 600. Permission of the instructor for nonmajors. Provides training in the theory of health economics and applies this theory to important issues in health policy and management.
* This course only meets the global health certificate requirements if taught by Dr. Harsha Thirumurthy as a residential course. If there is another instructor, you must get approval from the Office of Global Health.

HPM 722Global Perspectives on Ethical Issues in HPM (3) – Harris, Mondays 6:00-9:00pm

This course will address the ethical issues of health policy and administration, with particular attention to the global perspectives on these issues. These global perspectives are both comparative and trans-national. Thus, we will compare the ethical approaches to health system issues in various countries, such as the different perspectives on informed consent, refusal of treatment, physician-assisted suicide, and reproductive health. The course will address global perspectives on the ethical issues in rationing of care, allocation of resources, and cost-containment; ethical issues of corruption, kickbacks, and conflicts of interest; and ethical aspects of research with human subjects in both developing and developed countries. We will also consider the cross-border issues that arise from movement of patients and providers across national boundaries, such as treatment of undocumented aliens, medical tourism, and the “brain drain” of health care personnel from developing countries. Finally, the course will deal with organizational ethics and compliance, including ethical issues for U.S. health care professionals and organizations providing services in other countries.

Maternal and Child Health

MHCH 605 - Survey Course on Optimal Infant and Young Child Feed (3). Labbok, Spring
This survey course briefly covers the principal topics in this broad field of knowledge, including domestic and global issues. Teaching methods are primarily lecture with discussion and student presentations. The topics include relevant maternal and infant anatomy, physiology, and endocrinology; complementary feeding; immunology and disease; pathology, pharmacology and exposures; psychology, sociology and anthropology; growth and development; research issues; ethics, Code of Marketing and other legal issues; breastfeeding support skills; counseling, communication and advocacy; and programming and policy.

MHCH 664 - Crosslisted as HPM 664 Globalization and Health (3). Fried, Spring
*This is one of two courses students can take to fulfill the foundation course requirement for the Global Health Certificate Program.
The course examines multiple dimensions of globalization and explores their direct and indirect effects on determinants of health through presentations, case studies, class discussions, small group seminars, readings, weekly written assignments, a critical book review, and a final paper and poster session. An expected outcome of the course is that students will gain a deeper understanding of how the changes and transformations of globalization and development affect health, and will have examined responses and approaches to current global patterns that contribute to positive and adverse health effects, and health inequalities.

MHCH 690 - Global Sexual and Reproductive Health (1). Bennet, Spring
The class has no prerequisites and no student preparation will be required for the series of lectures, panel discussions, and debates featuring MCH adjunct faculty and other international experts from UNC and Triangle-based non-governmental organizations. The primary objective will be to inform students’ critical thinking on key public health issues in global sexual and reproductive health.

MHCH 700 -MCH Planning and Evaluation (3). Roth, Fall
This course will familiarize students with basic concepts and methodologies required for effective public health program planning, implementation and evaluation in a variety of settings, both domestic and global. Students in this course will develop a program plan and complete assignments designed to build competencies across a typical program planning life cycle. Given the focus on public health application, students will also discuss and practice skills needed to promote the benefits and address the challenges inherent in designing and evaluating public health programs in the context of an interdisciplinary project team. The course meets weekly with a lecture and group discussion format, supplemented by online lectures and team-based learning. Limited to residential students in MCH; priority given to 2nd year master’s students having completed EPID 600. Permission required for non-majors. Contact the MCH Student Services Manager for registration.

MHCH 712 - Program Assessment in MCH (3). Farel, Spring
Using a current request from a local health agency, students will learn how to provide consultation about a selected program activity in child health, women’s health, and global health. Student teams will make site visits, collect and analyze program data, prepare reports, conduct literature reviews, prepare a written report with recommendations, and make an oral presentation to the agency staff, MCH Department faculty and students. Permission required for non-majors.

MHCH 716 - International Family Planning and Reproductive Health (3). Curtis, Bloom, Spring
This course will provide an overview of the critical issues in international family planning and reproductive health, including major theoretical frameworks, patterns and trends over time, and family planning and reproductive health policy development. We will trace the evolution of the field from its demographic roots through the current expansion to a broader reproductive health perspective. The main theoretical models to explain the determinants of fertility and reproductive mortality and morbidity will be presented. Demographic data will be used to describe the trends and patterns of family planning and reproductive health within the global context. The development of population, family planning and reproductive health policy through the last three decades, along with the more recent focus on the field within the context of health and human rights, will be discussed.

MHCH 722 - Issues in International Maternal and Child Health (3). Ongechi, Fall
Focuses on the health status and needs of mothers and children, primarily but not exclusively in the developing world. Topics include primary health care; measurement and indicators of health status; levels and patterns of maternal and child morbidity and mortality; major programmatic intervention; oral rehydration therapy; and national policy orientations. Permission required for non-majors.

MHCH 723 - Introduction to Monitoring and Evaluation (3). Speizer Fall
This course provides students with the basic concepts and methodologies needed to monitor and evaluate programs in maternal and child health both domestically and internationally. The course covers program planning, conceptual frameworks, program monitoring, indicators, information sources, evaluation designs, and survey development. The focus is on practical issues for undertaking program monitoring and evaluation on maternal and child health programs.

MHCH 730 - Reproductive Health Policy – Bennett, Fall
Seminar participants will examine forces that shape social policy relating to reproduction and the differential impact of policy based on age, socioeconomic status, ethnicity, marital status, and other factors. Focus will be on global controversies in reproduction and reproductive health services in the context of human rights and women’s rights.

MHCH 862 - MCH Program Evaluation (3). Angeles, Spring
Analytic skills seminar, focusing on the methodology and practice of MCH progam evaluation. Review of concepts and methods for program evaluation will expose students to all phases and issues surrounding program evaluation. Case studies will be examined, with applications from developing countries. Prerequisites: Knowledge of SAS or STATA, MHCH 713 or equivalent. Permission required for 1 yr doctoral students, non-majors and master’s students.

Nutrition

NUTR 745 - International Nutrition – Adair, Bentley, Alternating Fall
Provides a broad overview of international nutrition research issues, programs, and policies. Topics will include micronutrient deficiencies, child feeding and growth, determinants of under- and over-nutrition, chronic disease and nutrition, food fortification and supplementation, and nutrition intervention programs and policy.

NUTR 750 - International Nutrition: Special Topics – Adair, Alternating Spring
Follow-up in greater detail of selected issues discussed in NUTR 745.

NUTR 809 - Qualitative Research Methods for Nutrition (3) - Bentley, Spring
This course is designed to introduce students to qualitative research methods with an emphasis on their use in nutrition-related program design and evaluation. The course will use a combination of didactic, interactive and applied techniques to teach knowledge and skills relevant to qualitative research. This is an introductory course by design and additional coursework in qualitative methods, particularly data analysis, is strongly recommended for those students who want to conduct qualitative research.

Public Health Leadership Program

PUBH 420 - AIDS: Principles, Practice and Politics (1). Strauss, Spring
This course offers participants a multi-disciplinary perspective on acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) — its etiology, immunology, epidemiology and impact on individuals and society. How AIDS is framed by a society determines not only how sick persons are treated by the degree to which the rights of the individual are upheld. GOAL: To understand the complexity and multi-dimensionality of the evolving phenomenon known as AIDS as a paradigm for the relationship between disease, society and public policy.

PUBH 500 - Global Health Discussion Series (0.5). Fried, Fall/Spring
Students pursuing the Graduate Certificate in Global health are required to sign up for two semesters of the discussion series while completing the certificate. Each session in the series will have a thematic frame that guides facilitated discussion. Themes will be recommended by students and by participating faculty. Formats might include: presentations; showing and discussion of a documentary; discussion of a news report; discussion of a book chapter or article; or, attending a special campus speaker’s presentation or event. Please note: this course is only available to graduate students pursuing the Graduate Certificate in Global Health.

PUBH 510 - Interdisciplinary Perspectives in Global Health (3). Bentley, Harris, Fall
This is one of two courses students can take to fulfill the foundation course requirement for the Global Health Certificate Program. The course explores contemporary issues, problems, and controversies in global health through an interdisciplinary perspective; examines the complex tapestry of social, economic, political, and environmental factors that affect global health; analyzes global health disparities through a social justice and human rights lens; analyzes the roles and agendas of major players in global health; looks at the link between global and local health issues; and exposes students to opportunities in global health work and research.

PUBH 704 (2). Foundations of Global Health Elective, Carlough, Spring, Tues 3:30-5PM
This course is designed for graduate students with a health background. Students will gain a broader understanding of population-based global health issues and social determinants of health. Critically examines global health topics will be critically examined with learning from on-line modules, readings, and a weekly seminar. Course will be run with a minimum of 4 registered students and maximum of 10 students.
To enroll, students need to contact Dr. Carlough.

PUBH 705 – One Health Intellectual Exchange Course: “Philosophy to Practical Integration of Human, Animal and Environmental Health” Sackey-Harris, Bentley (2-3)
The One Health course addresses the intersection of human, animal and environmental health. The weekly topics are designed to facilitate the understanding of health as an inexorably linked system requiring multidisciplinary collaborative efforts. Discussions include the bidirectional impact of animal health on human health, the impact of earth’s changing ecology on health, issues of food and water safety/security, the benefits of comparative medicine etc. Learning objectives include: describing how different disciplines contribute to the practice of One Health and identifying how interdisciplinary interventions can improve Global Health using a One Health model. This graduate-level course is open to junior and senior level undergrads. Please note: The course is available for 2 or 3 credits and is held off-site at the NC Biotechnology Center (http://www.ncbiotech.org/about-us/regional-offices/directions) Tuesdays from 5:30-7:30pm . The course includes students and professionals of diverse disciplines from Duke, UNC and NCSU. Students taking the course for 3 credits are required to also attend a 1 hour discussion session on Wednesday mornings (8:30 – 9:30am) on Duke or UNC campus. This course is limited to 15 students per university. More Information
Please contact Emily egeorge@email.unc.edu or Mamie msharris@med.unc.edu for questions or clarifications.

Additional Courses

Occasionally, there are courses offered outside of the School of Public Health that count toward the Global Health Certificate. Courses offered this semester include:

PLCY 565 - Global Health Policy – (3) Meier
This course provides an introduction to the relationship between international relations, global health policy and public health outcomes. With profound social, political and economic changes rapidly challenging global health, the aim of this course in Global Health Policy is to provide students with a variety of opportunities to understand the epidemiologic trends in world health, the institutions of global health governance, and the effects of globalization on global and national health policy.

PLCY 570Health & Human Rights – (3) Meier
Human rights are inextricably linked to the achievement of public health policy goals. This course provides an introduction to the relationship between health policy and human rights. The focus of this course will be on rights based approaches to health, applying a human rights perspective to selected public health policies, programs, and interventions. Specifically, this course will teach students how to apply a formalistic human rights framework to a wide range of critical issues in public health, exploring the role of human rights as both a safeguard against harm and a catalyst for health promotion. Upon completion, students will have acquired an understanding of the social, economic, cultural, legal, and political processes by which human rights inform public health objectives.

SPHG 690/PUBH 690Gillings Global Implementation Lab: India and North Carolina – (3) Farel, Hobbs, and Ramaswamy

(Global section will only count towards certificate)

This is a three-credit hour, graduate-level, interdisciplinary, field-based course in which teams of students apply knowledge and experience to design and implement systematic solutions to improve the delivery of public health services in partnership with organizations around the world. In addition to acquiring evidence-based applied experience, students will develop generalizable insights and learn effective implementation practices. Students will document their problem-solving approaches, results obtained and implementation lessons learned. On-campus coursework will take place before and after a required one or two-week field immersion with the host organization. One week of the field immersion will coincide with Spring Break in March. Some class sessions will be conducted on Saturdays.

Students will work in teams during spring semester on projects selected collaboratively with partner organizations. Some examples of projects include assessments of program quality, facilitation of rapid process improvement events and training of local staff on management and leadership. In classroom sessions at UNC CH prior to intensive site contacts, students will become familiar with project environments, collect and analyze performance data and develop solutions to address one specific performance issue. These solutions will be implemented and tested during the site session. In classroom sessions after the site visits, the learning from the implementation will be used to refine and finalize the solutions and a set of recommendations for the next round of improvement.

The Global Health Discussion Series (PUBH500) is only open to and is required of all students pursuing the Residential Graduate Certificate in Global Health. The course meets in the evening for 1.5 hours, five times a semester. Each session in the series will address a unique topic and might include presentations, screening and discussion of a documentary, discussion of a news report, discussion of a book chapter or article, or attending a special campus speaker’s presentation or event.

Earning a Graduate Certificate in Global Health requires students’ attendance at four of five sessions during each semester registered unless excused by seminar faculty member. No written assignments are required.

Click Fall or Spring to see the specific schedule:

Fall 2014 Schedule

Date and Location
6:15-7:45pm

Topic and Speaker

Date and Location 6:15-7:45pm

Monday, September 8, 2014
McGavran-Greenberg 2308

Topic and Speaker

International Practicum Experiences, Student Panel

Date and Location 6:15-7:45pm

Monday, September 29, 2014
McGavran-Greenberg 2308

Topic and Speaker

Research Utilization in a Global Health Context, Tricia Petruney, FHI360

Date and Location 6:15-7:45pm

Monday, October 13, 2014
McGavran-Greenberg 2308

Topic and Speaker

Health Informatics, Interoperability and Ebola, Amanda Puckett, IntraHealth International

Date and Location 6:15-7:45pm

Monday, October 27, 2014
McGavran-Greenberg 2308

Topic and Speaker

38 Maps that Explain the Global Economy

Date and Location 6:15-7:45pm

Monday, November 10, 2014
McGavran-Greenberg 2308

Topic and Speaker

TBD

Date and Location 6:15-7:45pm

Monday, November 17, 2014
McGavran-Greenberg 2308

Topic and Speaker

Optional Book Review

Spring 2015 Schedule

Date and Location

Topic and Speaker

Date and Location

TBD

Topic and Speaker

TBD

For additional information on the Residential Graduate Certificate in Global Health please contact globalgateway@unc.edu.

Students may apply here!  Residential Graduate Certificate in Global Health Handbook.

 

 


Online Global Health Certificate

The Online Certificate in Global Health for working health professionals around the world. It is a formal academic certificate for non-degree-seeking students that examines complexities inherent in improving health on a global scale. The online certificate strengthens the global health competencies and abilities of healthcare practitioners throughout North Carolina, the nation and the world. It is patterned after and built upon the highly successful Residential Graduate Certificate in Global Health offered by the Gillings Global Gateway and equally successful online certificates and master’s degrees offered by Public Health Leadership Program.

Click on each topic below to view specific information.

Goals of the Online Global Health Certificate:
  • Expand the global focus of students and professionals in North Carolina, the US and internationally, and specifically improve their skills to address global health issues;
  • Develop a collaborative learning approach to sharing the knowledge of global leaders and practitioners with Certificate participants;
  • Share knowledge on the causes and solutions to global health issues to benefit the changing populations of North Carolina, the United States and worldwide.
Curriculum for the Online Global Health Certificate:

Beginning in Fall 2014, we aim to increase the affordability of this certificate. Students can enroll in the Fall and complete the certificate the following Summer.

These are the current three courses totaling 9 graduate credit hours:

  • PUBH 711 Critical Issues in Global Health: This course explores contemporary issues, problems, and controversies in global health through an interdisciplinary perspective; examines the complex tapestry of social, economic, political, and environmental factors that affect global health; analyzes global health disparities through a social justice and human rights lens; and exposes students to opportunities in global health work and research. This course is a prerequisite for all other courses in the Online Global Health Certificate Program.
  • PUBH 712 Global Health Ethics: This course will introduce students to the theoretical and practical aspects of public health ethics and develop students’ analytical skills to evaluate ethical issues related to public health policy, prevention, treatment, and research. Topics include: ethical reasoning; concepts of justice; principles of interacting with communities; professional conduct and research. Prerequisite: PUBH 711.
  • PUBH 714 Monitoring and Evaluation of Global Health Programs: This course covers the fundamental concepts and tools for monitoring and evaluation of public health programs such as for HIV/AIDS/STDs, maternal health, reproductive health, child health, environment, and nutrition. Basic concepts and practices in M&E will be covered such as performance monitoring, impact evaluation, indicators, information systems, data collection methods, evaluation designs, strategic information in decision making, and communicating results to policy makers. Prerequisite: PUBH 711.
Course schedule for the Online Global Health Certificate:
  • Fall : Critical Issues in Global Health
  • Spring : Global Health Ethics
  • Summer: Monitoring and Evaluation of Global Health Programs
Eligibility, Application and Tuition
  • Bachelor’s degree (or international equivalent) required;
  • Resume or CV including relevant global health or public health work experience (minimum of 3-5 years preferred);
  • Statement of Purpose;
  • Transcripts (official or unofficial) required for your highest degree earned and relevant completed coursework. Please indicate degree and date received. Also include transcripts that demonstrate any relevant coursework for quantitative competencies;
  • TOEFL scores (within past five years) for international applicants.

Application for Fall 2014 will open in September; the deadline to apply is June 1, 2014. Please note there are limited spaces available in the program. Thus, applying early will provide a better opportunity for admission.

Apply for the Online Global Health Certificate
To begin the application process, please click here. If you have problems with the online form, please contact Student Services Manager Michele Fulton.
Contact Info
For additional information about the online Global Health Certificate, please contact faculty director Rohit Ramaswamy at Certificates@unc.edu or Michele Fulton at 919.843.5758.