Sandra Cianciolo, MPH, won the 2013 Innovation + Inspiration Staff Award, sponsored by the School’s Research and Innovation Solutions office. Cianciolo is project coordinator for the National Training Institute for Child Care Consultants, a project led by Jonathan Kotch, MD, Carol Remmer Angle Distinguished Professor of MCH. Penny Gordon-Larsen, PhD, NUTR professor, was elected vice-president of The Obesity Society, the leading scientific organization dedicated to the study of… Read more »

read more at www.sph.unc.edu/news Selected Publications John J.B. Anderson, PhD, professor emeritus of NUTR, found a relationship between calcium levels and the presence of white-matter lesions in the brain, particularly in men and in people with depression, in a study published June 18 in Nutrients. Ralph Baric, PhD, EPID professor, examined the genetic make-up of a dangerous new coronavirus, the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS-CoV),… Read more »

The people of North Carolina are more likely to live in poverty, die due to preventable conditions and have higher rates of obesity and tobacco use than people in most other states. Therefore, it is no surprise that when comparing health indicators among the 50 states, our state historically has ranked in the bottom third. In this context, some of… Read more »

Bill Gentry’s preparedness skills are legendary. From his college days as an emergency medical services technician in Wilmington, N.C., Gentry has valuedan organized, collaborative approach to getting the job done – especially when the job at hand is preserving health orsaving the lives of humans and animals. His emergency management work led him to UNC in 2005, where he now directs the Gillings… Read more »

Heart Healthy Lenoir, a community-based research effort based at the UNC Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention (HPDP), was established in Lenoir County, N.C., in 2010 to develop and test better ways to tackle cardiovascular disease (CVD) in a vulnerable North Carolina community. Alice Ammerman, DrPH, professor of nutrition at the Gillings School and HPDP director, leads the project in collaboration… Read more »

Growing up on a small farm in Jacksonville, Fla., as the great-granddaughter of a Chinese immigrant tenant farmer, Engexperienced cultural clashes as well as the power of community. “I saw how communities can come together,” says Eng, professor of health behavior at the Gillings School. “That’sa large part of why I gravitate toward looking at culture and how it’s… Read more »

For 14 years, the Gillings School’s North Carolina Institute for Public Health (NCIPH) has bridged the gap between academics and practice in North Carolina and beyond. The NCIPH is a provider of information and training, a connector and go-to place for brokering needs and the people who can fulfill them. Its ultimate mission is to improve the health of North… Read more »

Even in a country as developed as the U.S., the purity of drinking water is vulnerable to climate changes, major storm systems and the consequences of human behavior. Now, a new trend has fueled national and local discussions about the best ways to protect this vital resource – the introduction of industrial, agricultural and pharmaceutical chemicals into our water… Read more »

When Carmen Samuel-Hodge left her home in the Virgin Islands in 1985, diabetes had just begun to be a public health problem. As a dietitian, she was seeing many clinic patients who had presented with a diabetes diagnosis. Wanting to learn more about the problem and how to address it, she pursued a nutrition doctorate at UNC. Upon arriving in North Carolina, Samuel-Hodge discovered that diabetes was… Read more »

Dr. Jonathan Kotch has made life better for tens of thousands of children in North Carolina. His research and advocacy have changed policies about family health, and he has helped set national standards. Kotch’s accessibility contributes to his success, says June Locklear, who until her retirement, headed the regulatory section of the N.C. Division of Child Development. “He can speak… Read more »