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Superfund Research Program News

Study links prenatal exposure to arsenic to disease susceptibility later in life

April 7, 2014 Protein changes associated with prenatal exposure to arsenic may hold the key to understanding the workings of adult-onset diseases tied to arsenic in the environment, a study at UNC has found. In an article published online March 27 in Toxicological Sciences by the Oxford Journals, Rebecca C. Fry, PhD, associate professor of… Read more »

ESE master’s student develops chemical risk assessment interface

March 13, 2014 The following article, by Sara Mishamandani, is reprinted from the March 2014 issue of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences’ newsletter, Environmental Factor. The NIEHS article contains additional information, including a recording of Shapiro’s webinar tutorial. Andy Shapiro, a Master of Science in Public Health student in environmental sciences and engineering… Read more »

Study measures toxic metal levels in children residing in Vietnamese smelting village

March 12, 2014 Recycling car batteries by smelting them into lead ingots may recharge a community’s economy, but a study by researchers at UNC’s Gillings School of Global Public Health indicates that the resulting exposure to toxic metals can affect children who live near the smelters. The research team included Jonathan Kotch, MD, MPH, professor,… Read more »

Eight faculty members selected as innovative teachers at ‘Celebrate Teaching!’ event

March 3, 2014 The Gillings School of Global Public Health community gathered in the Armfield Atrium on Feb. 24 to celebrate eight faculty members – one from each academic unit at the School – who were selected by their students to receive the School’s third annual Teaching Innovation Awards. Awardees included Steve Cole, PhD  (epidemiology),… Read more »

Preventing arsenic-induced birth defects

As featured in the latest NIEHS Research Brief and this month’s NIEHS Environmental Factor, research led by Dr. Rebecca Fry has shown that blocking the glucocorticoid receptor pathway in a chick embryo model prevents birth defects induced by exposure to arsenic. These findings were the result of a novel systems biology approach combining computational analysis… Read more »

UNC toxicologists present NexGen tools to Canada’s national health agency

July 09, 2013 Members of the Gillings School of Global Public Health’s Carolina Center for Computational Toxicology conducted a workshop at Health Canada, in Ottawa on June 25, to introduce public health workers to computational toxicology tools for Next Generation (NexGen) environmental risk assessment.Health Canada, similar to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services,… Read more »

Dr. Rusyn discusses environmental chemicals and emerging research in toxicogenetics

Dr. Ivan Rusyn was recently featured in an interview about environmental chemicals and toxicogenetic research in the “Ask the Scientist” features of the News & Observer and Charlotte Observer.   During the interview, Dr. Rusyn described the challenges of evaluating chemical safety as well as new research to better understand how genetics can influence how… Read more »

Researchers use crowdsourcing to explore how genetics affect our response to toxins

June 10, 2013   A new collaboration of industry, government agencies and academia aims to better understand – through crowdsourcing – how a person’s individual genetics can influence the body’s response when it is exposed to certain environmental and pharmaceutical chemicals.Organized and led by scientists from The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Sage… Read more »

Preparing investigators for technology transfer and commercialization

On March 25, 1013 eighteen participants, including SRP trainees, faculty and staff from UNC’s Gillings School of Public Health and NIEHS staff member Beth Andersen, took part in a Technology Development Boot Camp sponsored by the UNC SRP Research Translation Core and the Office of Technology Development.   Boot Camp participants learned how to translate… Read more »

Alison Sanders, PhD candidate in Dr. Rebecca Fry’s lab, receives 2013 NC Impact Award

SRP trainee Allie Sanders was selected as a 2013 recipient of the UNC Graduate Education Advancement Board (GEAB) Impact Award. This award recognizes UNC graduate students whose research will benefit the citizens of North Carolina.   Allie is being recognized for her research on prenatal exposure to toxic metals through a study of pregnant women… Read more »