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School News

Study raises concerns about timely follow-up to positive mammogram for the uninsured

Uninsured women under age 65 who received their mammogram at community screening clinics in North Carolina were less likely to get follow-up within a year of a positive mammogram, according to a study led by senior author Louise Henderson, PhD, adjunct assistant professor of epidemiology.

Ward, Tate honored by The Obesity Society

Drs. Dianne Ward and Deborah Tate, nutrition professors, received prestigious awards from The Obesity Society for their career-long contributions to research that aims to prevent and treat obesity. Ward received the Bar-Or Award for pediatric obesity research, and Tate won the Pioneer Award, for demonstrating excellence in advancing technologies that prevent and treat obesity.

Student-developed app to link refugees with reproductive health services

mAdapt is a new app currently being co-developed by an alumna and two students of the Department of Maternal and Child Health. The mobile app uses cell phone technology to provide refugees with fast answers to questions about pressing reproductive health needs.

UNC-led, multicenter study to examine Metformin’s impact on infant health

Dr. Sonia Davis of the Department of Biostatistics will co-lead a five-year, multicenter clinical trial titled Medical Optimization and Management of Pregnancies with Overt Type 2 Diabetes (MOMPOD). MOMPOD will examine the impact of combined Metformin and insulin therapy on infant outcomes with mothers experiencing Type 2 diabetes in pregnancy.

JAMA study finds more patients obtain medications when they are prescribed electronically

A recent study published by JAMA Dermatology analyzed possible reasons why some patients do not fill prescriptions for dermatologic medications. Study researchers, including Elizabeth A. Suarez, doctoral student of epidemiology at the Gillings School, found that patients are more likely to obtain medications if they are prescribed in an electronic, rather than paper, format.

Schoenbach honored with APHA’s Lilienfeld Award for excellence in teaching epidemiology

Dr. Victor Schoenbach, associate professor of epidemiology, was selected for the Abraham Lilienfeld Award, given by the American Public Health Association’s epidemiology section. Schoenbach accepts the award on Oct. 31, during the APHA’s annual meeting, held in Denver. The award recognizes excellence in the teaching of epidemiology over the course of a career.

Leos to accept Outstanding Student Paper Award from APHA Latino Caucus

Cristina Leos, a student of health behavior, will receive an Outstanding Student Paper Award from the Latino Caucus of the American Public Health Association for her work around the educational experiences of Latino immigrant young men.

Linking maternal mortality files to violent death reporting system reveals more pregnancy-associated suicides, homicides

A recent study co-authored by Anna Austin, doctoral student of maternal and child health, and Dr. Catherine Vladutiu, Gillings School alumna and adjunct faculty member in epidemiology, revealed that violent deaths occurring during pregnancy and up to one year postpartum are under-reported. Linking traditional maternal mortality surveillance system records with the North Carolina Violent Death Reporting System captured 55.6 percent more pregnancy-associated violent deaths than traditional surveillance alone.

Study finds genetic variation may protect against certain oral cancers

A key variation in the genetic region important for regulation of the immune system provides heightened protection against the development of head and neck cancers in people infected with HPV. This is the finding of a new large-scale genetic study co-authored by Dr. Andrew Olshan, chair of the Department of Epidemiology.

Prevalence of drug-resistant staph may be higher in young children of hog workers, study finds

In one rural North Carolina county, young children residing with adults who work in large industrial hog farming operations had a higher prevalence of two types of antibiotic-resistant staph bacteria in their nasal passages than children living with adults who do not work in such operations.