School News

Leos to accept Outstanding Student Paper Award from APHA Latino Caucus

Cristina Leos, a student of health behavior, will receive an Outstanding Student Paper Award from the Latino Caucus of the American Public Health Association for her work around the educational experiences of Latino immigrant young men.

Linking maternal mortality files to violent death reporting system reveals more pregnancy-associated suicides, homicides

A recent study co-authored by Anna Austin, doctoral student of maternal and child health, and Dr. Catherine Vladutiu, Gillings School alumna and adjunct faculty member in epidemiology, revealed that violent deaths occurring during pregnancy and up to one year postpartum are under-reported. Linking traditional maternal mortality surveillance system records with the North Carolina Violent Death Reporting System captured 55.6 percent more pregnancy-associated violent deaths than traditional surveillance alone.

Study finds genetic variation may protect against certain oral cancers

A key variation in the genetic region important for regulation of the immune system provides heightened protection against the development of head and neck cancers in people infected with HPV. This is the finding of a new large-scale genetic study co-authored by Dr. Andrew Olshan, chair of the Department of Epidemiology.

Prevalence of drug-resistant staph may be higher in young children of hog workers, study finds

In one rural North Carolina county, young children residing with adults who work in large industrial hog farming operations had a higher prevalence of two types of antibiotic-resistant staph bacteria in their nasal passages than children living with adults who do not work in such operations.

Menachery receives prestigious award from International Cytokine and Interferon Society

Dr. Vineet Menachery is one of four recipients of the Seymour and Vivian Milstein Young Investigator Award for notable contributions to cytokine research, presented by the International Cytokine and Interferon Society.

Study finds daily self-monitoring of weight and activity helps prevent weight gain among breast cancer survivors

A recent study co-authored by Drs. Carmina Valle and Deborah Tate of the Gillings School found that daily self-monitoring of both weight and activity may be a feasible and accessible approach to promote weight gain prevention in breast cancer survivors.

Citing potential heart damage, experts recommend caution before taking calcium supplements

Dr. John Anderson, professor emeritus of nutrition, has co-authored an Oct. 11 article in the Journal of the American Heart Association which reports that taking supplemental calcium may raise the risk of plaque buildup in arteries and cause heart damage. A diet high in calcium-rich foods, however, appears to be protective.

Researchers identify new methodology for examining changes in lung cells after pollution exposure

Hang Nguyen, MS, doctoral student of environmental science and engineering in the Gillings School, is first author of a recent study that provided the initial test of a new methodology for examining the genomic response of lung cells to real-world mixtures of air pollutants.

Eng, Stafford, Cole and Darity honored at University Day event

Dr. Eugenia Eng and Paula Brown Stafford were honored at UNC’s University Day ceremony on Oct. 11. Eng, professor of health behavior, accepted the Edward Kidder Graham Faculty Service Award. Stafford, a biostatistics alumna, was named one of UNC’s five distinguished alumni.

UNC Gillings’ Water Institute, World Vision partnership will improve clean water access in 10 African nations

A six-year grant from World Vision to The Water Institute at UNC will create a partnership to improve water, sanitation and hygiene interventions in several low- and middle-income countries, with a long-term goal of helping to solve the global water and sanitation crisis by 2030.