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Research News

Out-of-pocket costs play major role in treatment adherence for cancer patients

Jan. 6, 2014 The cost of insurance co-payments for cutting-edge pharmaceuticals can vary widely from patient to patient. When the patient’s share of prescription costs becomes too high, many patients skip doses or stop taking medication entirely, according to research conducted at the University of North Carolina. Using data from health plan claims for the… Read more »

Frequent smoking in gay and lesbian movies may help LGBTs take up the habit

Jan. 6, 2014 The ways LGBT people are portrayed in the movies may contribute to higher rates of tobacco smoking among lesbians, gays, bisexuals and transgender (LGBT) people, a new University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill study finds. Led by Joseph Lee, MPH, health behavior doctoral student at UNC’s Gillings School of Global Public… Read more »

Breastfeeding increases when moms are supported by International Board Certified Lactation Consultants (IBCLCs), study finds

Dec. 26, 2013 Researchers at UNC’s Gillings School of Global Public Health and School of Medicine and Yeshiva University’s Albert Einstein College of Medicine have completed two studies that found that periodic meetings with an IBCLC supported women, who are traditionally resistant to breastfeeding, to succeed and to increase breastfeeding intensity for at least for… Read more »

British Medical Journal: UNC study finds numerous virgin births reported in US since mid-1990s

Dec. 17, 2013 The prestigious British Medical Journal has published a study by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill researchers that found numerous pregnancies reported by self-described virgins in The United States since the mid 1990s. The researchers, led by a team from UNC’s Gillings School of Global Public Health, discovered 45 “virgin pregnancies”… Read more »

Fast food not the major cause of rising childhood obesity rates, study finds

Dec. 16, 2013 For several years, many have been quick to attribute rising fast-food consumption as the major factor causing rapid increases in childhood obesity. However a new study found that fast-food consumption is simply a byproduct of a much bigger problem: poor all-day-long dietary habits that originate in children’s homes. The study, titled “The… Read more »

Screening decisions must balance potential benefits with potential patient harms

Dec. 10, 2013 Screening to detect medical conditions has become standard practice for many diseases, but insufficient attention has been paid to the potential for harm, according to a study conducted at the University of North Carolina. The study, published online Dec. 9 in The Journal of the American Medical Association – Internal Medicine, was… Read more »

Two Gillings faculty publish NEJM opinion piece on Obamacare

Dec. 12, 2013 While it’s undeniable that the launch of Obamacare’s healthcare.gov website had its initial technical shortcomings, states that have refused to set up insurance exchanges and expand Medicaid coverage could pose even bigger problems for health care coverage in the U.S. in the long term. That is the sentiment expressed in an opinion… Read more »

Children’s movies send mixed messages about eating habits and obesity

Dec. 10, 2013 Two Gillings School of Global Public Health alumnae, now working in the UNC School of Medicine, have found that many recent popular children’s movies feature content involving some characters who have unhealthy eating behaviors and others who stigmatize them for being overweight or obese. The study, led by Eliana M. Perrin, MD,… Read more »

Epidemiology students receive APHA grant to improve sexual health education on UNC campus

Dec. 2, 2013 Nadya Belenky, MSPH, and Diana Sanchez, MPH, epidemiology doctoral students at UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health, received the American Public Health Association’s Advocacy on Campuses that Impacts Our Nation (ACTION) award to launch a semester-long sexual health-themed social media campaign called “Let’s Talk About It, UNC.” “Social media programs are… Read more »

Screening new inmates for HIV may not reveal many new undetected cases, study shows

Nov. 26, 2013 More than 90 percent of HIV-infected inmates entering prison in North Carolina previously had tested positive for the virus, according to a study published in the Nov. 27 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.  A significant proportion of people with HIV in the United States enter the prison system… Read more »