Research News

Heart attack victims on Medicaid, from poor areas, face longer delays reaching hospital: study

September 25, 2008 People with Medicaid insurance and living in neighborhoods with lower household incomes appear less likely to reach the hospital within two hours of having a heart attack, according to a new study. Kathryn Rose, PhD Researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Public Health say patients tend… Read more »

New UNC laboratory to help track and control tropical diseases

September 25, 2008 Steven R. Meshnick, MD, PhD The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Public Health has established a new Gillings Innovation Lab to track and map tropical infectious diseases such as malaria, using state-of-the-art molecular and demographic methods. Better information about the prevalence and location of diseases will help national… Read more »

UNC study: parenting can override effect of genes in how babies respond to stress

September 22, 2008 Everyone gets stressed, even babies. Dr. Carolyn Halpern Now, it appears how infants respond to stress is linked to their having a particular form of a certain gene, according to a new study co-authored by Carolyn Halpern, PhD, associate professor of maternal and child health. Just as significantly, researchers say they also… Read more »

UNC receives record $181 million grant to evaluate health, poverty and gender programs worldwide

September 08, 2008 The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) has awarded the Carolina Population Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill up to $181 million to continue its MEASURE Evaluation project. Dr. Sian Curtis and Dr. Gustavo Angeles, faculty in the Department of Maternal and Child Health, will serve as… Read more »

Nearly half of U.S. adults will develop painful knee osteoarthritis by age 85: study

September 03, 2008 Dr. Todd Schwartz Almost half of all U.S. adults and nearly two-thirds of obese adults will develop painful osteoarthritis of the knee by age 85, a study based at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill suggests. Dr. Gary Koch Co-authors of the study include biostatistics faculty members Todd A. Schwartz,… Read more »

Gillings Innovation Lab takes novel approach to personal responses to arsenic in drinking water

August 28, 2008 The newest Gillings Innovation Laboratory at the University of North Carolina School of Public Health will tap new technology to help researchers examine individual differences in the metabolism of inorganic arsenic and in the susceptibility to adverse effects associated with chronic exposures to arsenic. The ultimate goal is to find out why… Read more »

UNC researcher focuses on community and worksite projects

August 27, 2008  “An important goal of my research is to addresses disparities in health,”  says Laura Linnan, Sc.D., Associate Professor in the Department of Health Behavior and Health Education, at UNC-CH School of Public Health. Dr. Linnan is interested in understanding why people are suffering disproportionately from major chronic diseases such as cancer and… Read more »

Both pre-hospital and in-hospital delays affect stroke care, UNC researchers show

August 21, 2008 Dr. Kathryn Rose Stroke patients who can’t recall when their symptoms started or do not arrive at the hospital in a timely manner cannot be considered for medications proven to help reduce the impact of stroke but which must be given within a certain time after the stroke occurs, University of North… Read more »

UNC study shows link between spanking and physical abuse

August 19, 2008 Mothers who report that they or their partner spanked their child in the past year are nearly three times more likely to state that they also used harsher forms of punishment than those who say their child was not spanked, according to a new study led by the Injury Prevention Research Center… Read more »

UNC researchers find MSG use linked to obesity

August 14, 2008 People who use monosodium glutamate, or MSG, as a flavor enhancer in their food are more likely than people who don’t use it to be overweight or obese even though they have the same amount of physical activity and total calorie intake, according to a University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill… Read more »