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Research News

UNC receives Lance Armstrong Foundation grant to study head and neck cancer survivors

May 29, 2007 Treatment for head and neck cancer is particularly aggressive, affecting speech, swallowing, breathing and communication. A grant from the Lance Armstrong Foundation to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill will fund research on the experiences of head and neck cancer survivors, so that health professionals can effectively manage the impact… Read more »

History of migraines associated with increased risk of retinopathy

  May 16, 2007 Middle-aged men and women with a history of migraine and other headaches are more likely to have retinopathy, damage to the retina of the eye which can lead to severe vision problems or blindness, than those without a history of headaches, according to a study from the University of North Carolina… Read more »

Coarse particulate matter in air may harm hearts of asthma sufferers, UNC study finds

May 09, 2007 Breathing air containing coarse particulate matter such as road or construction dust may cause heart problems for asthma sufferers and other vulnerable populations, according to a new study led by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Public Health. The researchers found that in people with asthma, a small… Read more »

Stress of deployment increases risk of child abuse, neglect in military families, UNC study shows

May 08, 2007 Rates of abuse and neglect of young children in military families in Texas has doubled since October 2002, a University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill study shows, raising concerns about the impact of deployment on military personnel and their families across the country. The study, published in the May 15, 2007… Read more »

Connection between weight, self-esteem linked to teen’s race, gender

May 07, 2007 Among young teens, race and gender affect whether self-esteem is linked to body weight, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill researchers have found. “We know that for many teenagers, how they feel about their bodies and how they feel about themselves are nearly identical,” said Eliana Miller Perrin, M.D., lead study… Read more »

Number of uninsured in North Carolina on the rise

April 23, 2007 The percentage of North Carolinians under the age of 65 who lacked health insurance for a year has risen from 15.3 percent in 2000 to 17.2 percent in 2005. The proportion of uninsured residents ranged from a low of 13.4 percent in Wake County to a high of 27.5 percent in Tyrrell… Read more »

Kotch leads Duke Endowment effort to prevent child abuse in North Carolina

April 13, 2007   Photograph of Dr. Jonathan Kotch Dr. Jonathan Kotch , professor in the Department of Maternal and Child Health, has been awarded a prestigious Duke Endowment grant to help prevent child maltreatment in eastern North Carolina. The “Family-Friendly Child Care” program, with Kotch as principal investigator, will receive more than $682,000 over… Read more »

Training 911 dispatchers to recognize symptoms

April 02, 2007 Training 911 dispatchers to recognize the symptoms of stroke may improve the chances of getting the right help to victims sooner, according to a University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill study. Researchers from UNC’s Schools of Public Health and Medicine surveyed 85 emergency dispatch centers in North Carolina between 2001 and… Read more »

False-positive mammograms have long-term negative consequences

  April 02, 2007 False-positive mammograms have long-term negative consequences for women, unnecessarily increasing their anxiety, according to a University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Public Health study. About half of American women receive a false-positive mammogram at some point in their lives. A false-positive mammogram happens when a women is told… Read more »

Family members most often source of whooping cough in young infants

March 27, 2007 Infants with whooping cough were most likely infected by the people they live with, according to a multi-country study led by researchers from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Public Health. The study found that parents were the source of pertussis, commonly known as whooping cough, in 55… Read more »