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Research News

Sandra Martin named Associate Dean for Research

September 06, 2007 Sandra Martin, PhD Dean Barbara K. Rimer has appointed Sandra Martin, PhD, to be Associate Dean for Research at the School of Public Health. Dr. Martin has been a professor and associate chair for research in Maternal and Child Health since 2004. As leader for the School’s Office of Research, the associate… Read more »

Pregnancy may increase the risk of developing binge eating disorder

September 06, 2007 Pregnancy may open a window of vulnerability for developing binge eating disorder, especially for women from lower socio-economic situations, according to a study from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill researchers and colleagues in Norway. In a long-term study of 100,000 pregnant Norwegian women, the researchers saw an unexpected increase… Read more »

Ibrahim, Qu co-author UNC study, question FDA genetic-screening guidelines for cancer drug

August 28, 2007 Not everyone needs a genetic test before taking the cancer drug irinotecan, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration should modify its prescription guidelines to say so, according to researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Joseph Ibrahim, Ph.D., and Pingping Qu, Ph.D., of the UNC School of Public… Read more »

Estrogen protects pregnant women from choline deficiency

August 17, 2007 Photograph of Dr. Steven Zeisel Young women are less likely than men or post-menopausal women to suffer liver or muscle damage from a deficiency of the nutrient choline, according to a new study led by Steven H. Zeisel, MD, PhD, Kenan Distinguished University professor of nutrition in the UNC School of Public… Read more »

Worldwide distribution of cervical cancer virus is consistent with vaccine targets

August 01, 2007 Dr. Jennifer Smith The variety of human papilloma viruses that cause invasive cervical cancer cases worldwide are largely consistent across continents, according to a new study from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. This finding means that prophylactic vaccines currently available against these two most prevalent types of human papillomavirus… Read more »

Child abuse, neglect rise dramatically when Army parents deploy to combat

August 01, 2007 Confirmed incidents of child abuse and neglect among Army families increase significantly when a parent is deployed to a combat zone, according to a new study by researchers at RTI International and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Public Health. Dr. Sandra Martin and Dr. Lawrence Kupper, professors… Read more »

2007 North Carolina Women’s Health Report Card gives mixed results

July 25, 2007 The good news: more women in North Carolina are being screened for cancer and infectious diseases, fewer women are dying from heart disease and stroke and the number of women who smoke has dropped substantially. The bad news: barriers to health care are worsening for poor and minority women. About 16 percent… Read more »

New way to target and kill antibiotic-resistant bacteria found

  July 09, 2007 Putting bacteria on birth control could stop the spread of drug-resistant microbes, and researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have found a way to do just that. Image of biophosphonates, bacterial cell and DNA strand The team discovered a key weakness in the enzyme that helps “fertile”… Read more »

Research shows upgraded equipment at child care centers improves health

July 06, 2007 Photograph of Dr. Jonathon Kotch Children and staff at child care centers stay healthier when better equipment is available for diaper-changing, hand-washing and food preparation, according to an article published this week in Pediatrics, the journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics. Jonathan Kotch, MD, professor of maternal and child health at… Read more »

HPV vaccine does not lead adolescent girls to have more sex, study says

June 19, 2007 Photograph of Dr. Noel T. Brewer Adolescent girls who are vaccinated against Human Papillomavirus (HPV), a sexually transmitted virus that may cause cervical cancer, are not likely to engage in sex more often than adolescent girls who are not vaccinated, according to a new study led by a researcher from the University… Read more »