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Research News

African-American women and those insured by Medicaid less likely to receive endocrine therapy to prevent breast cancer recurrence

June 6, 2014 New research by Stephanie B. Wheeler, PhD, and colleagues reveals that breast cancer patients insured by Medicaid and African-American breast cancer patients are less likely to receive life-saving endocrine therapy (ET) to prevent cancer recurrence. Wheeler,  assistant professor of health policy and management at UNC’s Gillings School of Global Public Health and… Read more »

BIOS students win half of awards presented at international symposium

June 5, 2014 Gillings School biostatistics students have won four of eight student research awards presented by the International Chinese Statistical Association and Korean International Statistic Society. Their work will be acknowledged during the 2014 Joint Applied Statistics Symposium of the two organizations, to be held June 15-18 in Portland, Ore. Winners include: Guanhua Chen… Read more »

Web-based and live counseling programs can reduce patients’ risk for heart disease

May 26, 2014 Web-based and live counseling programs effectively can reduce risk of heart disease for patients at high risk for the disease, and Web-based programs are particularly cost-effective, according to research from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The work, published online May 26 in JAMA Internal Medicine, adds to a growing… Read more »

Nutrition student examines diet and diabetes in China

May 23, 2014 An article written by Marla Broadfoot of the NC TraCS Institute and containing information that appears in this profile, appeared first on the UNC Health Care website.  Lindsay Jaacks has loved science since grade school; it was just a matter of deciding which branch she’d pursue. She conducted undergraduate research in a… Read more »

Study examines how dangerous respiratory viruses circumvent body’s defenses

May 20, 2014 Researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill are studying how some of the most dangerous viruses on the planet tailor their defenses to get around the body’s immune system. The study, published online May 20 in mBio, the journal of the American Society for Microbiology, could contribute to a better… Read more »

Antidepressant use in pregnancy may be associated with structural changes in the infant brain

May 19, 2014 A new study by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill researchers found that children of depressed mothers treated with a group of antidepressants called selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) during pregnancy were more likely to develop Chiari type 1 malformations than were children of mothers with no history of depression. A… Read more »

Breastfeeding promotion messages integrated into microcredit sessions encourage Nigerian women to breastfeed longer

May 13, 2014 Exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months of life is recommended by international agencies as a way to limit childhood illness and early death. Now UNC researchers have found that a program integrating microcredit, cellphone messaging and breastfeeding promotion can increase the number of women who exclusively breastfeed their infants. Led by… Read more »

Groundbreaking state dental program significantly increases preventive services, reduces cavities among children in need

May 9, 2014 In 2000, the State of North Carolina launched “Into the Mouths of Babes,” a program designed to promote dentists and physicians using an interdisciplinary approach to reducing cavities in young, low-income children. The program has led to a significant increase in the number of children under four years old receiving preventive dental… Read more »

Sugary drinks likely linked to escalating obesity in Mexico

May 8, 2014 Mexico has some of the world’s highest levels of both childhood and adult obesity, and a new study from The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill may have identified one of the main culprits – sugary beverages. The study, titled “Caloric beverages were major sources of energy among children and adults… Read more »

Water from improved sources not consistently safe, study finds

May 8, 2014 Digging a well or accessing water through pipes does not necessarily mean a household in the developing world will have safer drinking water than if they used more traditional – and traditionally unprotected – water sources. In fact, fecal contamination still occurs in about 25 percent of water from improved sources. These… Read more »