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Research News

Largest-ever genome-wide study on body fat and BMI strengthens genetic links to obesity

February 12, 2015 There are many reasons why two people with the same diets and exercise regimens can gain different amounts of weight and why fat becomes stored in different parts of their bodies. Now, an international collaboration of scientists, including several from UNC’s Gillings School of Global Public Health and School of Medicine, has… Read more »

CDC’s Workplace Health Research Network launched at UNC

February 9, 2015 Researchers from six research universities across the country gathered in Chapel Hill, N.C., on Feb. 5 and 6 to launch the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Workplace Health Research Network (WHRN) and conduct health research focused on the work environment, where the majority of Americans spend most of their time. The… Read more »

Fast-food labeling that ties eating to exercise may be a weapon against childhood obesity, study finds

February 9, 2015 A new study by researchers at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill found that parents ordering fast-food meals for their children were more likely to order meals with fewer calories and encourage exercise when product labeling tied calorie intake to the amount of exercise needed to burn those calories. The… Read more »

Children’s oral health video wins national contest

February 3, 2015 A video highlighting early childhood oral health research funded by the National Institutes of Health and conducted by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill researchers has won first place in the 2014 Power of Oral Health Research Video Contest, sponsored by Friends of the National Institute for Dental and Craniofacial Research… Read more »

Sobsey awarded UNC grant to study antimicrobially resistant fecal bacteria in sewage

January 23, 2015 Mark Sobsey, PhD, Kenan Distinguished Professor of environmental sciences and engineering at the Gillings School, has received a competitive pilot research grant from the UNC Institute for Global Health and Infectious Diseases (IGHID) and UNC Program in Nicaragua (ProNica) to evaluate water-borne antimicrobially resistant bacteria (ARB) in León, Nicaragua, and Chapel Hill,… Read more »

Yeatts discusses undergraduate public health education in Frontiers in Public Health

January 22, 2015 A recent article by Karin B. Yeatts, PhD, research assistant professor of epidemiology at the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health, describes the success of an introductory public health course for undergraduates that uses principles of active learning to help students experience public health practice and integrate concepts with their assignments…. Read more »

Study calls for new global standard for water and sanitation

January 15, 2015 A new study conducted jointly by The Water Institute at UNC-Chapel Hill and the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine calls for a new global standard for improvements in household drinking water and sanitation access. The study, “Does Global Progress on Sanitation Really Lag Behind Water?,” highlights that current benchmarks for… Read more »

Study to examine Ebola’s survival rate, disinfection in sewage

January 13, 2015 One of the effects of contracting the Ebola virus is severe diarrhea, which is literally flushed down the drain. But is this creating a new potential hazard, especially for sewer workers and others who may come in contact with this waste? The University of North Carolina will attempt to answer this question… Read more »

Burning synthetic fireplace logs may increase breast cancer risk

December 17, 2014 ’Tis the season to be burning synthetic fire logs, but a new study from UNC’s Gillings School of Global Public Health reports that using these prepackaged fireplace staples also could increase the chances of developing breast cancer. Alexandra White, MSPH, epidemiology doctoral student at the Gillings School, is first author of the… Read more »

Compact development reduces air pollution but may harm health, study finds

December 11, 2014 An analysis by a team of North Carolina-based environmental and planning researchers concludes that densely populated regions with compact urban development that discourages commuting by car—widely touted as a way to increase public exercise and reduce harmful automobile emissions—may only slightly lower average regional particulate matter (PM) concentrations in air. However, such… Read more »