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Research News

Study finds gaps in patients’ knowledge of breast reconstruction surgery and complications

January 12, 2016 A study by researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center and their collaborators has called for the provision of better information about the pros and cons of breast reconstructive surgery to breast cancer patients who undergo mastectomy. In a study published in the journal Annals… Read more »

Study reveals impacts of Mexico’s sugar-sweetened beverage tax after one year

January 6, 2016 A new study co-led by researchers from the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health is the first comprehensive, peer-reviewed study to examine the immediate effects of Mexico’s tax on all non-alcoholic beverages containing added sugar. The full study, titled “Beverage purchases from stores under the Mexican sugar-sweetened beverage excise tax: A… Read more »

Study finds urine sampling can be effective screening tool for high-risk HPV

December 18, 2015 Researchers from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have found that urine testing for high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) detection could provide a non-invasive, simple method for cervical cancer screening. Members of the team, including principal investigator Jennifer S. Smith, PhD, associate professor of epidemiology at the UNC Gillings School of… Read more »

Activity trackers are better at counting steps than measuring sleep, study finds

December 18, 2015 Wearable activity trackers that promise to monitor physical activity, sleep and more are becoming increasingly popular with health-conscious consumers. A recent study led by researchers from the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health and RTI International found that the trackers are better at measuring some metrics than others. Kelly Evenson, PhD,… Read more »

Study finds that Mexico’s excise tax on sugar-sweetened beverages was imposed directly only on consumers in urban areas

December 16, 2015 In the context of a very high prevalence of obesity and diabetes in Mexico, coupled with a high consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages in the country, the Mexican government in January 2014 implemented a one-peso-per-liter excise tax on all nonalcoholic beverages that contain added sugar, including powder, concentrates and ready-to-drink beverages. Researchers from… Read more »

Earlier use of hospice can lower costs, improve care of Medicare patients

While nearly half of terminally ill Medicare patients use the program’s end of life hospice benefit, a new study found that many of these patients may receive better and more cost effective care if they opt for hospice sooner once it has been deemed appropriate. The study, titled “Hospice Use, Hospitalization, and Medicare Spending at… Read more »

Cancer patient symptom surveys linked to reduced ER visits, improved survival and quality of life

December 7, 2015 Systematic collection of cancer patients’ symptoms using computer surveys was linked to less frequent emergency room admissions, longer average chemotherapy adherence, greater quality of life improvements, and improved survival, according to a new randomized, controlled trial spearheaded by a researcher at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The first-in-kind study,… Read more »

False-positive mammograms may indicate increased risk of breast cancer later

December 2, 2015 Women with a history of a false-positive mammogram result may be at increased risk of developing breast cancer for up to 10 years after the false-positive result, according to a study led by a researcher at the University of North Carolina. “Our finding that breast cancer risk remains elevated up to 10… Read more »

The global diet is getting sweeter, particularly when it comes to beverages

December 2, 2015 A new paper published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology highlights that the global diet is getting sweeter, particularly when it comes to beverages. The Personal View paper was co-authored by Barry M. Popkin, PhD, W. R. Kenan Jr. Distinguished Professor of nutrition at the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health… Read more »

Study explores supply-side options to increase access to state psychiatric hospital beds

December 1, 2015 When patients with mental health needs cannot be properly treated through outpatient or general hospital care, state psychiatric hospitals act as the ultimate safety net. These state facilities are specifically designed and staffed to care for people with severe mental illness. Such hospitals can competently see patients through immediate crises as well… Read more »