Category:

Research News

Risk of death for adults with blood cancer higher in three NC regions

June 28, 2016 Across North Carolina, the risk of death from the most common form of acute leukemia in adults was significantly higher in three regions of the state, according to a retrospective study by researchers from the University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center. Anne Marie Meyer, PhD, research assistant professor of epidemiology… Read more »

Replacing just one sugar-sweetened beverage with water each day can create a significant step in preventing weight gain

June 28, 2016 A new study by researchers from the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health has found that replacing even one daily serving of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) such as soda with water could result in a meaningful reduction in caloric intake and associated weight gain. The study co-authors are Jennifer Poti, PhD, research… Read more »

Newly discovered regulatory link between cells could lead to novel cancer therapies

June 28, 2016 Researchers in the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health have identified the mechanism by which p53 – an important cellular protein, also known as the tumor suppressor and regulator of cellular metabolism – functions in the cell. This newly discovered mechanism could potentially be targeted for the development of future cancer… Read more »

Weight gain prevention program shows some success in modifying weight-related behaviors among community college students

June 27, 2016 A two-year, technology-based intervention to prevent weight gain among young adults in community college effectively reduced consumption of fast food and improved overall weight-related behavioral patterns. The intervention was less effective in changing specific behaviors, including physical activity and sleep. These findings and more are the results of the Choosing Healthy Options… Read more »

Few adults aware of chemicals in cigarettes, study finds

June 22, 2016 Adults in the United States have little awareness of the chemical components of cigarette smoke, though many of them report having looked for information about the composition of tobacco products. In a study published in the journal BMC Public Health, researchers from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill suggest that… Read more »

Combination of obesity and a common human infection may increase anxiety levels

June 22, 2016 Anxiety and anxiety-related disorders are the most common mental health problem in the United States, with obese people having higher rates of anxiety than non-obese people. Data from a recent study reveal that this increased anxiety may be caused by an interaction between obesity and a very common human infection, which results… Read more »

Antibiotic-resistant form of syphilis bacterium identified in patients in Cuba

June 16, 2016 Treponema pallidum is the bacterium that causes syphilis, a sexually transmitted infection (STI) with no preventive vaccine. Researchers recently identified a mutated form of T. pallidum, which has become resistant to treatment with the macrolide class of antibiotics, in samples from 25 syphilis patients in Cuba. Lola Stamm, PhD, associate professor of… Read more »

Pettifor presents at UN’s ‘High-Level Meeting to End AIDS’

June 16, 2016 A UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health epidemiologist whose research focuses on social and structural drivers of HIV infection in sub-Saharan Africa was an invited speaker at the United Nations’ 2016 High-Level Meeting on Ending AIDS, held June 8-10 in New York City. Audrey Pettifor, PhD, associate professor of epidemiology at… Read more »

Cancer survivors with negative attitudes about social support may have lower quality of life

June 15, 2016 Cancer survivors who have been treated with stem cell transplants generally need to rely on their partner, family, friends and others for a successful recovery. Some survivors have negative attitudes about using their social network, however, and that reluctance may be decreasing their quality of life. These negative attitudes, collectively referred to… Read more »

AJPH editorial proposes a ‘causal impact’ framework to improve public health decision making

June 13, 2016 In a recently published editorial, researchers from the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health departments of epidemiology and biostatistics argue that a “causal impact” framework – one that includes internal and external validation and examines the effects of population-level interventions – could improve public health decision-making. Gillings School co-authors are Daniel… Read more »