Research News

Activity trackers offer insight into symptoms of bone marrow transplant patients

November 24, 2015 A recent study by researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has found that activity trackers (e.g. Fitbits) may be a valuable tool for assessing patient symptom burden in clinical research. Co-authors from the UNC Gillings School include lead author Antonia Bennett, PhD, research assistant professor, second author Bryce… Read more »

Study finds older adults consume too much phosphorus, too little calcium

November 24, 2015 A new study has found that high intake of dietary phosphorus, relative to calcium intake, is associated with a lower calcium to phosphorus ratio overall. When this ratio skews low for calcium and high for phosphorus, it potentially has adverse health effects including arterial calcification, bone loss and death. The three co-authors… Read more »

Study finds sizeable minority of physicians do not strongly endorse HPV vaccine

November 16, 2015 Five UNC researchers are co-authors of a paper published online Oct. 22 by Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention. The article, titled “Quality of Physician Communication about Human Papillomavirus Vaccine: Findings from a National Survey,” describes vaccine communication practices among primary care physicians. Melissa Gilkey, PhD, is a former postdoctoral fellow with UNC’s… Read more »

Hursting receives National Cancer Institute’s Outstanding Investigator Award

November 16, 2015 Stephen Hursting, PhD, professor of nutrition at the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health and the UNC Nutrition Research Institute, has received a prestigious National Cancer Institute (NCI) Outstanding Investigator Award (OIA). This award recognizes and provides stable funding for cancer research with breakthrough potential. Hursting, who is also a member… Read more »

Study finds tensions between medical homes and being patient-centered

November 12, 2015 A study co-authored by a UNC Gillings School of Public Health researcher and published Oct. 9 in the journal Social Science & Medicine describes how North Carolina incorporated case management for low-income pregnant women and young children into the state’s Medicaid managed care network. Dorothy Cilenti, DrPH, clinical assistant professor of maternal… Read more »

Gordon-Larsen awarded $2.5M grant to study whether microbiome links Western diet, cardiometabolic risk

November 11, 2015 Penny Gordon-Larsen, PhD, professor of nutrition at the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health, has been awarded a $2.5M grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for the project, “Transition to a Western diet and cardiometabolic risk: Biomarkers derived from the microbiome.” While recent work through the NIH Human Microbiome… Read more »

New SARS-like virus can jump directly from bats to humans, no treatment available

Findings provide an opportunity to develop drugs and vaccines for coronaviruses before they emerge from animals to cause a human epidemic November 9, 2015 Researchers from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have discovered a new bat SARS-like virus that can jump directly from its bat hosts to humans without mutation. However, researchers… Read more »

Study finds U.S. household food-shopping patterns shifting over time

November 2, 2015 Historically, nutrition programs and policies have focused on the need to build supermarkets in underserved areas in an effort to improve dietary quality in those communities. However, a recent study sheds more light on shifting household food-shopping patterns in the United States, and may bring changes to this traditional programmatic approach. Dalia… Read more »

Walmart’s healthier food initiative did not improve healthfulness of purchases, study finds

November 2, 2015 In recent years, more food retailers – including Walmart, Kroger and Safeway – have introduced initiatives to help consumers make healthier choices. Three researchers from the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health have conducted the first independent evaluation of whether a retailer-based healthier foods initiative actually improved the types and nutritional… Read more »

The key to drilling wells with staying power in the developing world

What happens after a well is drilled, fitted with a hand pump, and a community celebrates having access to clean water for the first time? Nearly half of them break down within a year. Where communities lack the capacity, resources, training, and support to repair such breakdowns, many of these wells may be rendered unusable… Read more »