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Research News

Gillings researchers describe new method of measuring performance on complex public health goals

February 4, 2016 Country-level performance on public health, human rights and international development goals is notoriously hard to measure. Recently, three researchers from the Water Institute at UNC’s Gillings School of Global Public Health proposed a new way to track performance against such targets. Through a novel application of “frontier analysis,” which is based on… Read more »

Gillings School researchers join US cancer centers in endorsement of HPV vaccination for cancer prevention

January 27, 2016 UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center has joined 68 other National Cancer Institute (NCI)-designated cancer centers across the U.S. in calling for increasing the rates of vaccination against the human papillomavirus (HPV). The institutions collectively recognize insufficient HPV vaccination as a public health threat and call upon the nation’s physicians, parents and young… Read more »

Folate — friend or foe?

January 25, 2016 This article, written by Alyssa LaFaro and Mary Lide Parker, appeared originally in the January edition of Endeavors magazine, a publication of UNC Research that features the university’s research and creative activity. Cereal, pasta, bread, cookies – what do they have in common? The answer is “folic acid,” a synthesized form of a… Read more »

UNC’s pediatric airway center continues to improve care for children with tracheostomies, study finds

January 19, 2016 Pediatric patients who have complex respiratory problems, especially children with tracheostomies, face serious challenges in the health care system. Often, they are treated by several specialists, and poor communication among providers can increase the chance that their care will be less than optimal. In an article published online Jan. 11 in the… Read more »

In African cities, encouraging community discussions may reduce myths, increase contraceptive use

January 13, 2016 In Nigeria, Kenya and Senegal, the most common family planning myths consistently include, “people who use contraceptives end up with health problems” and “contraceptives are dangerous to women’s health.” Ilene Speizer, PhD, research professor, and Chinelo Okigbo, doctoral student, are both researchers with the Department of Maternal and Child Health at the… Read more »

Study finds gaps in patients’ knowledge of breast reconstruction surgery and complications

January 12, 2016 A study by researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center and their collaborators has called for the provision of better information about the pros and cons of breast reconstructive surgery to breast cancer patients who undergo mastectomy. In a study published in the journal Annals… Read more »

Study reveals impacts of Mexico’s sugar-sweetened beverage tax after one year

January 6, 2016 A new study co-led by researchers from the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health is the first comprehensive, peer-reviewed study to examine the immediate effects of Mexico’s tax on all non-alcoholic beverages containing added sugar. The full study, titled “Beverage purchases from stores under the Mexican sugar-sweetened beverage excise tax: A… Read more »

Study finds urine sampling can be effective screening tool for high-risk HPV

December 18, 2015 Researchers from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have found that urine testing for high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) detection could provide a non-invasive, simple method for cervical cancer screening. Members of the team, including principal investigator Jennifer S. Smith, PhD, associate professor of epidemiology at the UNC Gillings School of… Read more »

Activity trackers are better at counting steps than measuring sleep, study finds

December 18, 2015 Wearable activity trackers that promise to monitor physical activity, sleep and more are becoming increasingly popular with health-conscious consumers. A recent study led by researchers from the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health and RTI International found that the trackers are better at measuring some metrics than others. Kelly Evenson, PhD,… Read more »

Study finds that Mexico’s excise tax on sugar-sweetened beverages was imposed directly only on consumers in urban areas

December 16, 2015 In the context of a very high prevalence of obesity and diabetes in Mexico, coupled with a high consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages in the country, the Mexican government in January 2014 implemented a one-peso-per-liter excise tax on all nonalcoholic beverages that contain added sugar, including powder, concentrates and ready-to-drink beverages. Researchers from… Read more »