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Nutrition News

Bentley, Silberman selected for Greenberg, Barr awards

February 16, 2016 Margaret (Peggy) Bentley, PhD, and Pam Silberman, JD, DrPH, will receive the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health’s prestigious Greenberg and Barr awards at a ceremony preceding the 48th annual Fred T. Foard Jr. Memorial Lecture on April 14 at 6:30 p.m. at The William and Ida Friday Center for Continuing… Read more »

Former US Assistant Surgeon General guides the Gillings School toward a ‘culture of health’

February 13, 2016 “Every day, you should take your dog for a long walk – even if you don’t have a dog!” says Penny Slade-Sawyer, with a grin. Slade-Sawyer, a retired rear admiral in the U.S. Public Health Service, former assistant surgeon general in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and former director… Read more »

Resolve to eat healthier in 2016

January 27, 2016 The article below, written by Susan Hudson, originally appeared in UNC’s University Gazette on Jan. 26. So what if you gain a little weight as you get older? A pound a year doesn’t make that much difference, does it? “A pound a year is not good. It cuts the number of healthy… Read more »

Folate — friend or foe?

January 25, 2016 This article, written by Alyssa LaFaro and Mary Lide Parker, appeared originally in the January edition of Endeavors magazine, a publication of UNC Research that features the university’s research and creative activity. Cereal, pasta, bread, cookies – what do they have in common? The answer is “folic acid,” a synthesized form of a… Read more »

Croffut to join future public health leaders at CDC summit

January 11, 2016 Samantha Croffut, a graduate student of nutrition at the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health, has been selected as a delegate to the 2016 Millennial Health Leaders Summit. The event, which will be hosted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, Ga., March 31 – April 1,… Read more »

Study reveals impacts of Mexico’s sugar-sweetened beverage tax after one year

January 6, 2016 A new study co-led by researchers from the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health is the first comprehensive, peer-reviewed study to examine the immediate effects of Mexico’s tax on all non-alcoholic beverages containing added sugar. The full study, titled “Beverage purchases from stores under the Mexican sugar-sweetened beverage excise tax: A… Read more »

Study finds that Mexico’s excise tax on sugar-sweetened beverages was imposed directly only on consumers in urban areas

December 16, 2015 In the context of a very high prevalence of obesity and diabetes in Mexico, coupled with a high consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages in the country, the Mexican government in January 2014 implemented a one-peso-per-liter excise tax on all nonalcoholic beverages that contain added sugar, including powder, concentrates and ready-to-drink beverages. Researchers from… Read more »

Bentley named secretary/treasurer of CUGH executive committee

December 15, 2015 Margaret (Peggy) Bentley, PhD, has been named the next secretary/treasurer of the Consortium of Universities for Global Health (CUGH). Bentley is the Carla Smith Chamblee Distinguished Professor of Global Nutrition at the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health. She also is associate dean of global health for the School and associate… Read more »

The global diet is getting sweeter, particularly when it comes to beverages

December 2, 2015 A new paper published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology highlights that the global diet is getting sweeter, particularly when it comes to beverages. The Personal View paper was co-authored by Barry M. Popkin, PhD, W. R. Kenan Jr. Distinguished Professor of nutrition at the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health… Read more »

Study finds older adults consume too much phosphorus, too little calcium

November 24, 2015 A new study has found that high intake of dietary phosphorus, relative to calcium intake, is associated with a lower calcium to phosphorus ratio overall. When this ratio skews low for calcium and high for phosphorus, it potentially has adverse health effects including arterial calcification, bone loss and death. The three co-authors… Read more »