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Nutrition News

BSPH students inducted into Phi Beta Kappa

November 19, 2014 Fourteen of the 148 undergraduates admitted into Phi Beta Kappa, the nation’s oldest and most honored college honorary society, are students at the Gillings School of Global Public Health. Phi Beta Kappa membership is open to undergraduates in the college and professional degree programs who meet stringent eligibility requirements. A student who… Read more »

Nearly 5 percent of U.S. children have some form of fetal alcohol exposure disorder, study finds

November 6, 2014 Far more children may have fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) in the U.S. than was previously thought, according to a new study at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Philip A. May, PhD, research professor of nutrition at the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health, and colleagues found that… Read more »

UNC receives USDA funding to help prevent obesity in families receiving government assistance

November 6, 2014 The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has been chosen to house one of four new Regional Centers of Excellence in Nutrition Education and Obesity Prevention to help nutritional assistance services improve obesity prevention efforts for families receiving these subsidies. The center, funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Institute… Read more »

Postpartum obesity can lead to breast cancer, study finds

November 6, 2014 Though it has long been thought that pregnancy can reduce the chance of breast cancer, a new study finds this may not be so, at least for a specific type of breast cancer. The study, led by Liza Makowski, PhD, assistant professor of nutrition at The University of North Carolina at Chapel… Read more »

Gillings Global Gateway™ to partner with RTI International on USAID contract

November 3, 2014 The UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health and its Gillings Global Gateway™ are partnering with RTI International on a newly awarded U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) contract for services in Africa. RTI International is a prime contractor for Technical Assistance and Support for the Africa Region (TASC4 – AFRICA), which… Read more »

Prenatal arsenic exposure may lead to gene reprogramming in children, study finds

October 31, 2014 A new study at UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health found that prenatal exposure to inorganic arsenic may lead to detrimental health effects and gene reprogramming in children. The findings were published Oct. 10 in Toxicological Sciences, the official journal of the Society of Toxicology. Rebecca Fry, PhD, associate professor of… Read more »

New research center will explore ways to encourage healthy food choices

October 29, 2014 A new center will combine the expertise of researchers at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Duke University to develop strategies to promote healthy food choices, particularly among the 50 million Americans receiving federal food benefits. The Duke-UNC USDA Center for Behavioral Economics and Healthy Food Choice Research (BECR… Read more »

Siega-Riz discusses her life and work as a woman scientist

October 24, 2014 In the past decade, the percentages of women attaining degrees in engineering and computer sciences have remained stagnant, even as these fields have continued to drive the highest demands in the workforce. To address the gender disparity in the fields of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM), UNC Diversity and Multicultural Affairs,… Read more »

Withholding certain foods from children may lead to weight gain, study finds

Oct. 22, 2014 Many parents believe the best way to prevent their children from becoming obese is to limit their intake of calories or withhold particular types of foods altogether. However, a new study from The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill challenges this belief. The study supports growing evidence that, in the long… Read more »

Study: Daily tasks can get sedentary workers closer to national physical activity guidelines

October 9, 2014 People with deskbound or sedentary jobs who have difficulty finding time to work out still can meet national guidelines for physical activity as long as they engage in other active daily tasks. Those are the findings of a new study from researchers at The University of North Carolina’s Gillings School of Global… Read more »