Maternal and Child Health News

Young adults with chronic illnesses have poorer educational and job outcomes

March 08, 2011 Young adults who grow up with certain chronic illness – including cancer, diabetes and epilepsy – are less likely than their healthy peers to graduate from high school, get a job and be self-supporting, according to a study by researchers at UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health.Those who grew up with… Read more »

Martin honored by Women’s Leadership Council for mentoring students

February 22, 2011 Dr. Sandra Martin Sandra L. Martin, PhD, has been selected to receive the 2011 Carolina Women’s Leadership Council Mentoring Award for student mentoring. Martin is professor of maternal and child health and associate dean for research at UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health. Martin said she was thrilled to be honored… Read more »

UNC’s 32nd annual Minority Health Conference addresses the promise of health equity

February 07, 2011 The UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health’s Minority Student Caucus will host its 32nd annual Minority Health Conference on Feb. 25, from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at The William and Ida Friday Center for Continuing Education in Chapel Hill, N.C. Dr. Bonnie Duran The conference’s 13th annual William T. Small… Read more »

Public health school authors describe international health initiatives in NC Medical Journal

January 31, 2011 Dr. Tom Ricketts The current issue of the North Carolina Medical Journal (NCMJ) includes articles by a number of faculty and staff members and students at UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health. The issue, “International Health Initiatives in North Carolina,” highlights North Carolina-based activities to improve health around the world. Commentaries… Read more »

UNC breastfeeding institute director named Women’s Center Faculty Scholar

December 08, 2010 Dr. Miriam Labbok Miriam Labbok, MD, MPH, University of North Carolina Gillings School of Global Public Health Professor of the Practice of maternal and child health and director of the Carolina Global Breastfeeding Institute (CGBI), has been selected as the Carolina Women’s Center Faculty Scholar for the Fall 2011 semester.   The… Read more »

School hosts international meeting to prepare special population issue of The Lancet

December 02, 2010 The UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health hosted a working group of global experts in disciplines including economics, demography, epidemiology, political science and environmental science on Dec. 1-3. Representatives from international organizations – including The World Health Organization (WHO), United Nations Population Fund and the World Bank – met to prepare… Read more »

The world is fat

November 29, 2010 * Our article uses the title of a popular treatise by Dr. Barry Popkin, The World is Fat: The Fads, Trends, Policies and Products That Are Fattening the Human Race (New York, Penguin Books, 2008). For more information, see   Across North Carolina and around the world, researchers from UNC Gillings… Read more »

Peterson honored by United Kingdom’s Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists

November 17, 2010 Dr. Herbert Peterson Herbert Peterson, MD, Kenan Distinguished Professor and chair of UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health’s maternal and child health department, has been selected as an honorary fellow of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists’ (RCOG) Faculty of Sexual and Reproductive Healthcare. He will be awarded the fellowship… Read more »

Siega-Riz named associate dean for academic affairs

November 08, 2010 Dr. Anna Maria Siega-Riz Anna Maria Siega-Riz, PhD, professor of nutrition and of epidemiology in the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health, has been named the School’s new associate dean for academic affairs, effective Dec. 1.   Siega-Riz will succeed Peggy Leatt, PhD, who has served as associate dean for academic… Read more »

School’s scientists receive National Cancer Institute grant to address cancer health disparities

October 27, 2010 Cancer is the leading cause of death in North Carolina, but it doesn’t affect all citizens equally. North Carolina rates of prostate and colon cancer in African-Americans are 47 percent and 15 percent higher, respectively, than in Caucasians, and breast cancer deaths among African-American women are 20 percent higher than for Caucasians…. Read more »