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Health Behavior News

What Works to Prevent Cancer?

  May 16, 2012   Changing human behavior, combined with increased monitoring of environmental exposures, can help prevent cancer.   Many preventable cases of cancer happen because human behavior is so difficult to change. With cervical cancer, for instance, nearly 100 percent of cases could be prevented using available tools, including vaccination against the human… Read more »

Preventing accidents, injuries and violence

May 16, 2012   Every child on the playground thinks she’s invincible. Watch one swinging skyward; another, rock climbing. In our adult lives, despite accidents, injuries and violence, we all too often live as if we were invincible, too. But through all stages of life, we need protective policies and practices to reduce chances of… Read more »

Public health graduate students earn competitive global internships

May 09, 2012   Ten current graduate students at UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health received competitive global internships for summer 2012 or for the coming academic year. Doctoral student Paul Fleming and master’s student Jennifer Velloza, both studying health behavior and health education, received the prestigious UNC- FHI 360 Fellowship. The yearlong program… Read more »

Online retailers, shipping companies give minors access to alcohol, study finds

May 08, 2012 Minors easily can purchase alcohol online as a result of poor age verification by Internet alcohol vendors and shipping companies such as FedEx and UPS, according to new research from The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.   Dr. Kurt Ribisl Dr. Rebecca Williams Kurt Ribisl, PhD, professor of health behavior… Read more »

Public health groups and individuals honored for public service

  April 12, 2012   Projects to support breastfeeding at hospitals in North Carolina, HIV-positive youth in Uganda, and the participation of Latino men in reproductive health were among those honored March 28 at an annual awards ceremony conducted by the Carolina Center for Public Service. Kathy Parry (left) and Emily Taylor accept Bryan Awards… Read more »

Six public health students receive The Graduate School’s 2012 Impact Awards

April 09, 2012 The loss of farm land, limited HIV resources, stroke evaluation, tick bites, motor-vehicle crashes and postpartum depression comprise the issues researched by six former and current public health graduate students who received Impact Awards from UNC’s Graduate School earlier this month.   The awards recognize students whose research may improve the lives… Read more »

Adolescent expectations of early death predict young adult socioeconomic status

  April 05, 2012 Adolescents’ expectations of an early death can predict their economic futures more than a decade later, according to a new study from the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health.   Individuals who did not expect to live to age 35 had lower levels of educational attainment and lower personal earnings… Read more »

Students show off dance moves in NPHW flash mob

April 05, 2012   Folks hanging out in the Armfield Atrium around lunchtime on April 4 found themselves caught up in the middle of a flash mob as a group of about 40 students kicked and wiggled through some of singer Beyonce’s fancy dance steps and her song, “Move Your Body.”   Staged during National… Read more »

School celebrates National Public Health Week

March 29, 2012 Since 1995, the American Public Health Association (APHA) has designated the first full week of April as National Public Health Week, developing campaigns to educate the public, policy makers and practitioners about issues related to a given theme. With the recent release of the National Prevention Strategy, APHA staff members decided this… Read more »

Hiding emotions may exacerbate depression among black men who confront racial discrimination

March 14, 2012 Enduring subtle, insidious acts of racial discrimination is enough to depress anyone, but African-American men who believe that they should respond to stress with stoicism and emotional control experience more depression symptoms, according to new findings from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.The study, “Taking It Like a Man: Masculine… Read more »