Category:

Epidemiology News

Maintaining weight after age 40 increases breast cancer survival

September 19, 2007 Women sometimes feel there’s nothing they can do to improve their chances of survival after a breast cancer diagnosis. But there is, according to scientists at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and other institutions. Don’t gain weight after age 40. A new study shows premenopausal women who gain more… Read more »

Jeno Bratts accepts Staff Excellence Award with humility, appreciation

September 13, 2007 Jeno Bratts accepts the Staff Excellence Award On Friday, September 7, Jeno M. Bratts, systems manager in Instructional and Information Systems at the School of Public Health, was honored as recipient of the School’s 2007 Staff Excellence Award. Bratts was presented with a framed certificate and monetary award at an afternoon reception… Read more »

Pregnancy may increase the risk of developing binge eating disorder

September 06, 2007 Pregnancy may open a window of vulnerability for developing binge eating disorder, especially for women from lower socio-economic situations, according to a study from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill researchers and colleagues in Norway. In a long-term study of 100,000 pregnant Norwegian women, the researchers saw an unexpected increase… Read more »

School faculty and staff recognized for service to Humphrey Fellowship Program

August 29, 2007 Two UNC School of Public Health faculty members have received teaching awards and another eight were recognized for their service as advisors to the 2006-2007 Hubert H. Humphrey Fellowship Program, based in the UNC Department of Public Policy. The Hubert H. Humphrey Fellowship Program brings accomplished professionals from designated countries of Africa,… Read more »

Worldwide distribution of cervical cancer virus is consistent with vaccine targets

August 01, 2007 Dr. Jennifer Smith The variety of human papilloma viruses that cause invasive cervical cancer cases worldwide are largely consistent across continents, according to a new study from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. This finding means that prophylactic vaccines currently available against these two most prevalent types of human papillomavirus… Read more »

UNC Public Health students receive awards at International Conference on Global Health

June 20, 2007 Photograph of Dr. Peggy Bentley (second from left) with winning students HIV transmission risks, including violence, male circumcision and mother-to-child transmission was the focus of research presentations by three University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill public health students during the Global Health Council’s (GHC) 34th Annual International Conference on Global Health…. Read more »

Racism’s role in disease focus of minority health video conference

June 07, 2007 “Does racism make us sick?” is the question addressed by the 13th annual Summer Public Health Research Video Conference on Minority Health, sponsored by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Public Health’s Minority Health Project and the university’s Office of Diversity and Multicultural Affairs. The interactive conference will… Read more »

Taking folic acid does not reduce risk of precancerous colon tumors

June 05, 2007 Taking folic acid supplements does not reduce the risk of developing precancerous tumors in the colon and may even increase the risk, a new study has found. Photograph of Dr. Robert Sandler “We had great hope that folic acid would be a very cheap and effective agent to prevent large bowel adenomas…. Read more »

Sun exposure early in life linked to specific skin cancer gene mutation

May 30, 2007 Skin cancers often contain different gene mutations, but just how these mutations contribute to the cause of melanomas has been a mystery. A new clue comes from scientists at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Schools of Medicine and Public Health. Their research indicates that early life sun exposure, from… Read more »

UNC receives Lance Armstrong Foundation grant to study head and neck cancer survivors

May 29, 2007 Treatment for head and neck cancer is particularly aggressive, affecting speech, swallowing, breathing and communication. A grant from the Lance Armstrong Foundation to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill will fund research on the experiences of head and neck cancer survivors, so that health professionals can effectively manage the impact… Read more »