Category:

Epidemiology News

Partnerships, cancer research in Malawi to expand with new NCI grant

November 10, 2014 UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center and the UNC Institute for Global Health and Infectious Diseases have received a $3.7 million grant from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) to study the growing worldwide cancer problem and expand the University’s efforts in Malawi to study and treat HIV-associated cancers. Andrew Olshan, PhD, Barbara Sorenson… Read more »

Postpartum obesity can lead to breast cancer, study finds

November 6, 2014 Though it has long been thought that pregnancy can reduce the chance of breast cancer, a new study finds this may not be so, at least for a specific type of breast cancer. The study, led by Liza Makowski, PhD, assistant professor of nutrition at The University of North Carolina at Chapel… Read more »

Improved mouse model will accelerate research on potential ebola vaccines, treatments

Oct. 31, 2014 In the war against Ebola, one important hurdle has just been cleared – by a mouse. A study published online Oct. 30 in Science magazine details how researchers from The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and their colleagues have developed a new genetic strain of mice that will significantly improve… Read more »

Elevated arsenic in Mexico’s drinking water poses health risks for pregnant women, infants

October 27, 2014 Millions of people around the world drink water with levels of inorganic arsenic that exceed standards set by the World Health Organization. A new Gillings School of Global Public Health study highlights that certain populations, including pregnant women and newborn children, are especially vulnerable when exposed to increased levels of arsenic. In… Read more »

Siega-Riz discusses her life and work as a woman scientist

October 24, 2014 In the past decade, the percentages of women attaining degrees in engineering and computer sciences have remained stagnant, even as these fields have continued to drive the highest demands in the workforce. To address the gender disparity in the fields of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM), UNC Diversity and Multicultural Affairs,… Read more »

Hilton Goulson, alumnus and former faculty member, dead at 84

Oct. 23, 2014 Hilton Thomas Goulson, PhD, alumnus of UNC’s school of public health, former faculty member in parasitology and laboratory practice at the School, and longtime donor and friend, passed away on Oct. 21 in the Chapel Hill, N.C., home where had lived for 62 years. He was 84. Dr. Goulson, who spearheaded the… Read more »

High levels of metals in well water may be linked to birth defects in children

October 9, 2014 Increased levels of metals such as cadmium, arsenic, lead and manganese in North Carolina are present in private well water, and some may be linked to defects in children, a new UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health study has found. In a research article published Sept. 15 by BioMed Central Public… Read more »

Epidemiology alumnus studies ways to optimize pediatric antiretroviral therapy

Oct. 9, 2014 A new study helps clinicians weigh immunologic benefits against viral failure risks when timing the administration of antiretroviral therapy for children who are HIV-positive. Dwight E. Yin, MD, MPH, alumnus of the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health’s epidemiology department and assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of Missouri at… Read more »

Westreich receives prestigious NIH New Innovator award

October 8, 2014 Daniel Westreich, PhD, assistant professor of epidemiology at The University of North Carolina’s Gillings School of Global Public Health, has been awarded a prestigious New Innovator Award from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). According to the NIH, the award is presented to scientists proposing highly innovative approaches to major contemporary challenges… Read more »

Alumna helps develop app to personalize heart disease risk

October 8, 2014 Reprinted from newswise.com Although cardiovascular disease is largely avoidable through lifestyle modifications, it remains the nation’s number one cause of death. While annual wellness exams offer physicians the chance to advise patients on modifying cardiac risk factors, that advice can get lost easily, given the amount of information covered during a routine… Read more »