Category:

Epidemiology News

ECHO program receives grant to reduce prostate cancer disparities in N.C.

October 28, 2010 A project led by the University of North Carolina Program on Ethnicity, Culture and Health Outcomes (ECHO) which aims to address the high rate of prostate cancer among African-American males in Caswell Co., N.C., has received a grant of $18,916 from UNC-Chapel Hill’s Community-Campus Partnership (CCP).   Dr. Anissa Vines Anissa Vines,… Read more »

School’s scientists receive National Cancer Institute grant to address cancer health disparities

October 27, 2010 Cancer is the leading cause of death in North Carolina, but it doesn’t affect all citizens equally. North Carolina rates of prostate and colon cancer in African-Americans are 47 percent and 15 percent higher, respectively, than in Caucasians, and breast cancer deaths among African-American women are 20 percent higher than for Caucasians…. Read more »

Ten Gillings Merit Scholarships awarded to new graduate students

October 06, 2010 Ten graduate students at UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health have received the inaugural Gillings Student Merit Scholarships. The scholarships were established to help the School recruit graduate students with exceptional promise and potential.   Top row (L-R): Rudra, Allaire, Gellert, Moss, Lesesne; Second row (L-R): Newkirk, Kasrawi, Erber, Harkins, Hahn… Read more »

School faculty members present at international injury prevention conference

September 22, 2010 A number of UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health faculty members will make presentations at the 10th World Conference on Injury Prevention and Safety Promotion, held Sept. 21-24 in London.   Dr. Carol Runyan Dr. Kant Bangdiwala UNC presenters include Shrikant Bangdiwala, PhD, research professor at the biostatistics department’s Collaborative Studies… Read more »

UNC scientists to study pregnancy, obesity and breast cancer disparities

September 22, 2010 UNC scientists have received a five-year, $2.2 million grant to study how factors such as pregnancy and obesity may promote susceptibility to an aggressive subtype of breast cancer that is more prevalent in young African-American women. The grant is funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) Breast Cancer and… Read more »

Landmark children’s health study launches in Durham County

September 15, 2010 Residents of Durham County, N.C., are encouraged to take part in the largest ever long-term study of children’s health and development undertaken in the United States.   Researchers soon will begin enrolling participants in the National Children’s Study, which will examine the effects of environmental influences on the health and development of… Read more »

UNC, Children’s Hospital Boston develop iPhone app to report, receive drug safety news

September 15, 2010 Researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Children’s Hospital Boston have developed a new iPhone application to encourage health care professionals and patients to send and receive information about the use and side effects of prescription medications.   The application, “MedWatcher,” allows users to track the latest drug… Read more »

Public health alumna, McGill University innovator to speak at University Day

September 14, 2010 The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill community will celebrate its history as the nation’s first public university during University Day on Oct. 12, 2010.   Dr. Heather Munroe-Blum The theme of this year’s University Day convocation will be innovation and entrepreneurship. The featured speaker, Heather Munroe-Blum, PhD, is a highly… Read more »

AIDS virus changes in semen make it different than in blood

August 23, 2010 Dr. Myron Cohen The virus that causes AIDS may undergo changes in the genital tract that make HIV-1 in semen different than what it is in the blood, according to a study led by researchers from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Myron Cohen, MD, J. Herbert Bate Distinguished Professor… Read more »

Corporal punishment of children remains common worldwide

August 09, 2010   Spanking and other forms of corporal punishment of children are still common in the United States and worldwide according to a recent study by researchers at the University of North Carolina Injury Prevention Research Center. Dr. Desmond Runyan Lead author Desmond Runyan, MD, DrPH, clinical professor of epidemiology at the UNC… Read more »