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Epidemiology News

Cuba offers example for countries striving to eliminate mother-to-child transmission of syphilis, HIV

Currently, several countries in the Americas are poised to eliminate mother-to-child-transmission (MTCT) of syphilis. With the Zika virus epidemic, however, low-income countries face unanticipated challenges. Dr. Lola Stamm discusses why it is imperative that the commitment to eliminate MTCT of syphilis be sustained.

Study finds diet as effective and less expensive than drugs in treating esophageal inflammation

Dr. Daniel Erim and colleagues found that a six-food elimination diet was as effective as topical corticosteroids — and less expensive — in treating eosinophilic esophagitis, a condition in which inflamed esophageal tissue leads to a person’s difficulty in swallowing solid foods. Erim is a doctoral student in health policy and management.

Five Gillings School junior faculty members receive development awards

Five faculty members from three departments in the Gillings School were awarded 2017 IBM Junior Faculty Development Awards.

UNC researchers create first model of MERS-CoV virus in mouse populations

Researchers from UNC have announced a new mouse model for Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infection. This publication marks the first time that an animal model has successfully reproduced the MERS-CoV disease symptoms seen in human patients.

UNC, Duke-NUS team identifies first step to neutralizing Zika

A team of researchers from the UNC Gillings School and the Duke-NUS Medical School has discovered the mechanism by which C10, a human antibody previously identified to react with the Dengue virus, prevents Zika infection at a cellular level.

Steve Wing, beloved teacher and committed activist, dies at 64

Dr. Steve Wing, activist for environmental justice and advocate for human rights, mentor and friend to many, died peacefully Nov. 9 after a valiant battle with cancer. An associate professor of epidemiology, Wing had been a member of the Gillings School faculty since 1985.

Study raises concerns about timely follow-up to positive mammogram for the uninsured

Uninsured women under age 65 who received their mammogram at community screening clinics in North Carolina were less likely to get follow-up within a year of a positive mammogram, according to a study led by senior author Louise Henderson, PhD, adjunct assistant professor of epidemiology.

JAMA study finds more patients obtain medications when they are prescribed electronically

A recent study published by JAMA Dermatology analyzed possible reasons why some patients do not fill prescriptions for dermatologic medications. Study researchers, including Elizabeth A. Suarez, doctoral student of epidemiology at the Gillings School, found that patients are more likely to obtain medications if they are prescribed in an electronic, rather than paper, format.

Schoenbach honored with APHA’s Lilienfeld Award for excellence in teaching epidemiology

Dr. Victor Schoenbach, associate professor of epidemiology, was selected for the Abraham Lilienfeld Award, given by the American Public Health Association’s epidemiology section. Schoenbach accepts the award on Oct. 31, during the APHA’s annual meeting, held in Denver. The award recognizes excellence in the teaching of epidemiology over the course of a career.

Linking maternal mortality files to violent death reporting system reveals more pregnancy-associated suicides, homicides

A recent study co-authored by Anna Austin, doctoral student of maternal and child health, and Dr. Catherine Vladutiu, Gillings School alumna and adjunct faculty member in epidemiology, revealed that violent deaths occurring during pregnancy and up to one year postpartum are under-reported. Linking traditional maternal mortality surveillance system records with the North Carolina Violent Death Reporting System captured 55.6 percent more pregnancy-associated violent deaths than traditional surveillance alone.