Epidemiology News

Linking maternal mortality files to violent death reporting system reveals more pregnancy-associated suicides, homicides

A recent study co-authored by Anna Austin, doctoral student of maternal and child health, and Dr. Catherine Vladutiu, Gillings School alumna and adjunct faculty member in epidemiology, revealed that violent deaths occurring during pregnancy and up to one year postpartum are under-reported. Linking traditional maternal mortality surveillance system records with the North Carolina Violent Death Reporting System captured 55.6 percent more pregnancy-associated violent deaths than traditional surveillance alone.

Study finds genetic variation may protect against certain oral cancers

A key variation in the genetic region important for regulation of the immune system provides heightened protection against the development of head and neck cancers in people infected with HPV. This is the finding of a new large-scale genetic study co-authored by Dr. Andrew Olshan, chair of the Department of Epidemiology.

Menachery receives prestigious award from International Cytokine and Interferon Society

Dr. Vineet Menachery is one of four recipients of the Seymour and Vivian Milstein Young Investigator Award for notable contributions to cytokine research, presented by the International Cytokine and Interferon Society.

UNC Gillings students collaborate to promote awareness of gender-based violence

The UNC Gender-Based Violence Research Group will sponsor two events in October, which is Domestic Violence Awareness Month.

Particular HPV strain linked to improved prognosis for throat cancer

Gillings School researchers including Dr. Jose Zevallos and Dr. Andrew Olshan confirmed findings that a particular strain of HPV, a virus linked to a number of cancers, resulted in better overall survival for patients with oropharyngeal cancer than patients whose tumors contained other strains of the virus.

Genetic variations specific to African ancestry may increase kidney disease risk in Hispanic, Latino populations

A new study has revealed that genetic alleles linked to African ancestry may contribute to chronic kidney disease among Hispanics and Latinos, especially those with roots in the Caribbean region. Study co-authors from the Gillings School are Drs. Nora Franceschini and Jianwen Cai.

Racial gaps persist in how breast cancer survivors function and feel during and after treatment

Gillings School professors Drs. Bryce Reeve and Andrew Olshan led a study of several thousand breast cancer survivors in North Carolina. They found differences in how African-American and white women functioned and felt during their treatment and two years post-diagnosis.

UNC’s Gillings School number one public school of public health for NIH funding

September 7, 2016 Once again, the University of North Carolina’s Gillings School of Global Public Health is the number one public school of public health when it comes to funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). NIH provided the data for the 2015 Fiscal Year and UNC’s Gillings School was listed as the number… Read more »

International study finds 20 genetic regions, across all ethnic ancestries, associated with kidney function

September 1, 2016 A large international collaboration marks the first study of kidney function involving individuals from four continents. After examining kidney function in African, Asian, European and Hispanic individuals, researchers found 20 genetic regions that affect kidney function and are common across all ethnic ancestries. The full paper, titled “Trans-ethnic fine-mapping highlights kidney function… Read more »

UNC’s Endeavors magazine highlights Gillings School researchers

August 18, 2016 Endeavors, the online magazine highlighting research and creative activity at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, featured six Gillings School of Global Public Health researchers in its August issue – Drs. Gregory Characklis, Myron Cohen, David Margolis and Wizdom Powell, and students Vidya Venkataramanan and Meaghan Nazareth. _______________ Gregory Characklis,… Read more »