Category:

Epidemiology News

Particular HPV strain linked to improved prognosis for throat cancer

Gillings School researchers including Dr. Jose Zevallos and Dr. Andrew Olshan confirmed findings that a particular strain of HPV, a virus linked to a number of cancers, resulted in better overall survival for patients with oropharyngeal cancer than patients whose tumors contained other strains of the virus.

Genetic variations specific to African ancestry may increase kidney disease risk in Hispanic, Latino populations

A new study has revealed that genetic alleles linked to African ancestry may contribute to chronic kidney disease among Hispanics and Latinos, especially those with roots in the Caribbean region. Study co-authors from the Gillings School are Drs. Nora Franceschini and Jianwen Cai.

Racial gaps persist in how breast cancer survivors function and feel during and after treatment

Gillings School professors Drs. Bryce Reeve and Andrew Olshan led a study of several thousand breast cancer survivors in North Carolina. They found differences in how African-American and white women functioned and felt during their treatment and two years post-diagnosis.

UNC’s Gillings School number one public school of public health for NIH funding

September 7, 2016 Once again, the University of North Carolina’s Gillings School of Global Public Health is the number one public school of public health when it comes to funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). NIH provided the data for the 2015 Fiscal Year and UNC’s Gillings School was listed as the number… Read more »

International study finds 20 genetic regions, across all ethnic ancestries, associated with kidney function

September 1, 2016 A large international collaboration marks the first study of kidney function involving individuals from four continents. After examining kidney function in African, Asian, European and Hispanic individuals, researchers found 20 genetic regions that affect kidney function and are common across all ethnic ancestries. The full paper, titled “Trans-ethnic fine-mapping highlights kidney function… Read more »

UNC’s Endeavors magazine highlights Gillings School researchers

August 18, 2016 Endeavors, the online magazine highlighting research and creative activity at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, featured six Gillings School of Global Public Health researchers in its August issue – Drs. Gregory Characklis, Myron Cohen, David Margolis and Wizdom Powell, and students Vidya Venkataramanan and Meaghan Nazareth. _______________ Gregory Characklis,… Read more »

Gillings Merit Scholars and Gillings Dissertation Awards announced

August 17, 2016 Sixteen students at UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health have been selected as 2016-2017 recipients of Gillings Merit Scholarships or Gillings Dissertation Awards. The scholarship and dissertation award funds, established in 2010 to help the Gillings School recruit and support graduate students with exceptional promise and potential, were made possible through… Read more »

Gillings School’s summer undergraduate training program inspires new group of young scholars

July 29, 2016 As the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health’s summer undergraduate training program comes to a close this week, participants and mentors are celebrating another season during which a diverse group of motivated young men and women were provided with opportunities to develop skills in public health research. The 2016 training program,… Read more »

For NC breast cancer patients, insurance type and distance to care can be barriers to breast reconstruction

July 28, 2016 Women were less likely to have breast reconstruction surgery after mastectomy if they had Medicaid or Medicare rather than private insurance or if they lived 10 or more miles from a plastic surgeon’s office, a University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center study has found. Anne Marie Meyer, PhD, research assistant… Read more »

UNC Gillings Study: Antibodies from Dengue fever survivors can be used to prevent Zika infection

July 26, 2016 Antibodies derived from patients who survived Dengue fever can be used to fight the Zika virus now and potentially open the door for the development of a Zika therapeutic treatment in the not too distant future. Those are among the findings of a new study led by researchers at the University of… Read more »