Environmental Sciences and Engineering News

US News ranks UNC Gillings #2 overall, #1 public

March 10, 2015 The University of North Carolina’s Gillings School of Global Public Health has been ranked the number two school of public health overall – and the number one public school of public health – by U.S. News and World Report. The rankings were released March 10. This marks the second consecutive rankings period… Read more »

Herrington, astronaut and educator, to speak at Gillings School commencement

February 15, 2015 Astronaut and education advocate John B. Herrington, PhD, Commander in the U.S. Navy (retired), will provide the commencement address to graduates of The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s Gillings School of Global Public Health. The ceremony will be held at Carmichael Arena on Saturday, May 9 at 1 p.m. Herrington,… Read more »

ESE’s Coronell and Noble receive $1.68M in UNC system grants related to water

Feb. 13, 2015 The University of North Carolina General Administration has awarded six three-year grants totaling nearly $9 million to support game-changing faculty research in areas of strategic importance to the state. Each of the funded projects involves partners from two or more UNC campuses. Orlando Coronell, PhD, assistant professor of environmental sciences and engineering… Read more »

Faculty members recognized for innovative teaching at annual ‘Celebration Teaching!’ event

February 12, 2015 Eight members of the faculty at the Gillings School of Global Public Health – one from each academic unit at the School – were honored at a ‘Celebrate Teaching!’ event on Feb. 11 and presented with the School’s fourth annual Teaching Innovation Awards. The awardees are Lori Evarts, MPH, clinical assistant professor… Read more »

New Gillings Innovation Labs awarded

February 2, 2015 Four new projects – two designed to improve chronic disease care, one aimed at increasing access to cervical cancer screening, and another to track land-applied biosolids – are the most recent Gillings Innovation Labs. Established in 2007 as part of the $50 million Gillings gift, Gillings Innovation Laboratories (GILs) are designed to… Read more »

Banks receives ESE’s Distinguished Alumna Award

January 26, 2015 M. Katherine Banks, PhD, vice chancellor for engineering for the Texas A&M University system and dean of the Dwight Look college of Engineering at Texas A&M, received the 2014 Environmental Sciences and Engineering (ESE) Distinguished Alumna Award at the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health on Jan. 23. Banks, who received… Read more »

Sobsey awarded UNC grant to study antimicrobially resistant fecal bacteria in sewage

January 23, 2015 Mark Sobsey, PhD, Kenan Distinguished Professor of environmental sciences and engineering at the Gillings School, has received a competitive pilot research grant from the UNC Institute for Global Health and Infectious Diseases (IGHID) and UNC Program in Nicaragua (ProNica) to evaluate water-borne antimicrobially resistant bacteria (ARB) in León, Nicaragua, and Chapel Hill,… Read more »

Study calls for new global standard for water and sanitation

January 15, 2015 A new study conducted jointly by The Water Institute at UNC-Chapel Hill and the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine calls for a new global standard for improvements in household drinking water and sanitation access. The study, “Does Global Progress on Sanitation Really Lag Behind Water?,” highlights that current benchmarks for… Read more »

ESE’s West selected as Stanford University Leopold Leadership Fellow

January 15, 2015 Jason West, PhD, associate professor of environmental sciences and engineering at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s Gillings School of Global Public Health, was one of 20 researchers in the U.S. and Canada selected as a 2015 Leopold Leadership Fellow. Based at the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment at… Read more »

Study to examine Ebola’s survival rate, disinfection in sewage

January 13, 2015 One of the effects of contracting the Ebola virus is severe diarrhea, which is literally flushed down the drain. But is this creating a new potential hazard, especially for sewer workers and others who may come in contact with this waste? The University of North Carolina will attempt to answer this question… Read more »