Category:

Environmental Sciences and Engineering News

Swenberg gives keynote at toxicology conference in Korea

James Swenberg, PhD, Kenan Distinguished Professor of environmental sciences and engineering at the Gillings School, delivered the keynote address at the 30th annual meeting of the Korean Society of Toxicology/Korean Environmental Mutagen Society, held at Muju Deogyusan Resort, in Jeonbuk, Korea, Nov. 6-7. Swenberg’s lecture, “Using Science to Improve Risk Assessment,” addressed use of the… Read more »

BSPH students inducted into Phi Beta Kappa

November 19, 2014 Fourteen of the 148 undergraduates admitted into Phi Beta Kappa, the nation’s oldest and most honored college honorary society, are students at the Gillings School of Global Public Health. Phi Beta Kappa membership is open to undergraduates in the college and professional degree programs who meet stringent eligibility requirements. A student who… Read more »

ESE doctoral students awarded inaugural Dennis and Mireille Gillings fellowships for work at Institut Pasteur

November 11, 2014 University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill doctoral students Maya Nadimpalli and Patsy Polston are inaugural recipients of the prestigious Dennis and Mireille Gillings Global Public Health Fellowships, a collaboration between UNC’s Gillings School of Global Public Health and the Pasteur Foundation, the U.S. affiliate of Institut Pasteur. The fellowships include the… Read more »

NIOSH awards Nylander-French $1M to study susceptibility to toxic compounds

November 6, 2014 The National Institute of Occupational Health and Safety has awarded more than $1 million to a UNC researcher for two studies to find biomarkers that might help determine which workers are most susceptible to diseases caused by toxins in automotive spray paints and other surface coatings. Leena Nylander-French PhD, CIH, professor of… Read more »

Characklis invited to attend National Academy of Sciences event

November 3, 2014 Greg Characklis, PhD, professor of environmental sciences and engineering at the Gillings School of Global Public Health, has been invited to participate in the U.S. Kavli Frontiers of Science symposium, the National Academy of Science’s premiere activity for distinguished young scientists. Attendees are selected by a committee of Academy members from among… Read more »

Prenatal arsenic exposure may lead to gene reprogramming in children, study finds

October 31, 2014 A new study at UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health found that prenatal exposure to inorganic arsenic may lead to detrimental health effects and gene reprogramming in children. The findings were published Oct. 10 in Toxicological Sciences, the official journal of the Society of Toxicology. Rebecca Fry, PhD, associate professor of… Read more »

Elevated arsenic in Mexico’s drinking water poses health risks for pregnant women, infants

October 27, 2014 Millions of people around the world drink water with levels of inorganic arsenic that exceed standards set by the World Health Organization. A new Gillings School of Global Public Health study highlights that certain populations, including pregnant women and newborn children, are especially vulnerable when exposed to increased levels of arsenic. In… Read more »

Folt named professor in Gillings School’s environmental sciences and engineering department

October 24, 2014 Carol Folt, PhD, chancellor of The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, has received joint appointments as professor in the College of Arts and Sciences’ Department of Biology and in the Gillings School of Global Public Health’s Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering. “We are very pleased to welcome Chancellor Folt… Read more »

Edema Ojomo: Doctoral student will present at The Water Institute’s fall conference

Oct. 10, 2014 The annual Water and Health Conference, held this year Oct. 13-17 at UNC’s Friday Center for Continuing Education, will host about 500 participants interested in drinking water supply, sanitation, hygiene and water resources in both the developing and developed worlds. For more information, see whconference.unc.edu. Edema Ojomo, an environmental sciences and engineering… Read more »

High levels of metals in well water may be linked to birth defects in children

October 9, 2014 Increased levels of metals such as cadmium, arsenic, lead and manganese in North Carolina are present in private well water, and some may be linked to defects in children, a new UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health study has found. In a research article published Sept. 15 by BioMed Central Public… Read more »