Allison E. Aiello, PhD

Professor and Social Epidemiology Program Leader Department of Epidemiology
Fellow Carolina Population Center

T:(919) 966-2149

F:(919) 966-2089

2101C Mcgavran-Greenberg Hall

CB #7435

Chapel Hill, NC 27599


Dr. Allison E. Aiello is a professor of epidemiology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's Gillings School of Global Public Health.

She received her PhD with distinction in epidemiology from Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health and was the recipient of the Ana C. Gelman award for outstanding achievement and promise in the field of epidemiology.

Her research investigates psychosocial, socioeconomic and racial/ethnic disparities in health; the relationship between infection and chronic diseases; and prevention of infection in the community setting. She has identified relationships between psychosocial determinants and immune response to infection and helped uncover social disparities in the burden of infection and immune response to cytomegalovirus in the United States population.

Currently, Dr. Aiello is the PI of several NIH funded studies where she is examining social, behavioral, biological and genetic determinants of health outcomes.

Representative Courses

Social Epidemiology Seminar

Research Activities

Conduct research designed to elucidate biological mechanisms underlying disparities in physical and mental health outcomes

Investigate non-pharmaceutical interventions for reducing influenza transmission

Key Publications

Toxoplasma gondii and anxiety disorders in a community-based sample. Markovitz AA, Simanek AM, Yolken RH, Galea S, Koenen KC, Chen S,Aiello AE (2015). Brain Behavior and Immunity, 43.

Persistent viral pathogens and cognitive impairment across the life course in the third national health and nutrition examination survey. Tarter KD, Simanek AM, Dowd JB, Aiello AE Journal of Infectious Diseases, 209(6), 837-844..

Epigenetic signatures may explain the relationship between socioeconomic position and risk of mental illness: preliminary findings from an urban community-based sample. Uddin M, Galea S, Chang SC, Koenen KC, Goldmann E, Wildman DE, Aiello AE (2013). Biodemography and Social Biology, 59(1), 68-84.

Secular trends in Helicobacter pylori seroprevalence in adults in the United States: evidence for sustained race/ethnic disparities. Grad YH, Lipsitch M, Aiello AE (2012). American Journal of Epidemiology, 175(1), 54-59.

Mask use, hand hygiene, and seasonal influenza-like illness among young adults: a randomized intervention trial. Aiello A.E. , Murray G.F., Perez V., Coulborn R.M., Davis B.M., Uddin M., Shay D.K., Waterman S.H., Monto A.S. (2010). The Journal of Infectious Diseases, 201(4), 491-498.

Cytomegalovirus antibody levels, inflammation and mortality among elderly Latinos over 9 years of follow-up. Roberts, E.T., Haan, M.N., Dowd, J.B., Aielloa A.E.  (2010). American Journal of Epidemiology, 172(4), 363-371.

Socioeconomic position and inflammatory and immune biomarkers of cardiovascular disease: applications to the Panel Study of Income Dynamics. Aiello, A.E. , Kaplan, G.A. (2009). Biodemography and Social Biology, 55(2), 178-205.

Socioeconomic differentials in immune response. Dowd, J.B. and Aiello, A.E. (2009). Epidemiology, 20(6), 902-908.


PhD (with distinction), Epidemiology, Columbia University, 2003

MS, Environmental Sciences, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, 1998

BS, Environmental Sciences, University of Massachusetts-Amherst, 1995